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International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept
This 2014 Article IV Consultation highlights that growth in Fiji in 2013 accelerated to 4.6 percent. Consumption and investment indicators suggest continued strength in 2014, with economic growth projected at 3.8 percent. Headline inflation is currently low as imported commodity and food prices have remained stable. The Reserve Bank of Fiji lowered its policy rate to 0.5 percent in 2011, and monetary policy has been on hold since then. In response to lower rates and improved confidence, net domestic credit accelerated in the first half of 2014. Based on developments in the first half of 2014, the deficit financing target is on track to be met.
Ms. Elva Bova, Mr. Robert Dippelsman, Ms. Kara C Rideout, and Ms. Andrea Schaechter
When discussing debt reduction strategies, little attention has been given to the role of governments’ nonfinancial assets. This is in part because data are scarce. Drawing on various data sources, this paper looks at the size, composition, and management of state-owned nonfinancial assets across 32 economies, with particular focus on the advanced G-20 economies. We find that reported nonfinancial assets comprise mostly structures (such as roads and buildings) and,when valued, land. These assets have increased over time, mostly due to higher property and commodity prices, and are, in large part, owned by subnational governments. Many countries have launched reforms with a view to streamlining public administrations, but receipts and savings have been rather small so far. Governments tend to consider relatively small sets of assets to be disposable, though preferences could change in the future. A potential source for future revenues could be greater reliance on user charges, such as road tolls. In most cases, a first step for more effective asset management has to be the expansion and improvement of data compilation.
International Monetary Fund
A useful but little known feature of the IMF’s Government Finance Statistics Yearbook (GFSY) is the information on the structure of governments. Institutional tables, included in the GFSY, provide detail on the central, state, and local levels of governments, social security, and extrabudgetary units. We refer to the main levels of government as GL1, GL2, and GL3 in ascending order of institutional coverage. We present maps of the various levels of government for 74 countries to illustrate the usefulness of this database and make it more accessible to users. The maps provide information about how centralized or decentralized government finances and employment are and their size relative to the overall economy. Government map data facilitate the monitoring of fiscal policy and fiscal rules.
International Monetary Fund
The Australian government registered strong financial performance during the period under review. There was an increase in net worth owing to transactions, as measured by the net operating balance (NOB). These resources enabled the government to reduce its net liabilities and, to a lesser extent, acquire financial assets on a net basis. The Australia pilot study is considered a point of reference for other pilot studies implementing the Government Finance Statistics Manual 2001 framework, as a means of strengthening fiscal analysis.
Ms. Davina F. Jacobs
The following hypothesis was set and tested by this study: is the conventional budget balance, as generally accepted and used, still relevant for South Africa? The paper found that several possible alternatives are available but each must be viewed from the standpoint of their applicability to the South African context. Several were not suitable for South Africa-only because of a serious lack of available data needed to make them operational. The paper also highlights the need for reforms in government financial information in South Africa.
International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This paper presents a coordinated portfolio investment survey guide provided to assist national compilers in the conduct of the Coordinated Portfolio Investment Survey, conducted under the auspices of the IMF with reference to the year-end 1997. The guide covers a variety of conceptual issues that a country must address when conducting a survey. It also covers the practical issues associated with preparing for a national survey. These include setting a timetable, taking account of the legal and confidentiality issues raised, developing a mailing list, and maintaining quality control checks.