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International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
The current FCL arrangement for Colombia was approved in May 2020. Colombia was cited for its very strong policy frameworks—anchored by a flexible exchange rate, a credible inflation-targeting regime, effective financial sector supervision and regulation, and a structural fiscal rule—and a track record of very strong policy implementation that served as a basis for the economy’s resilience prior to the Covid-19 pandemic.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This paper discusses Colombia’s Arrangement Under the Flexible Credit Line (FCL) and Cancellation of Current Arrangement. Growth is expected to accelerate in 2018 and further over the medium term underpinned by a rebound in investment and nontraditional exports. Although the ongoing recovery in global growth has reduced some near-term external risks, global financial markets are vulnerable to a sudden, sharp tightening of financial conditions as a result of an unexpected increase in inflation and/or an escalation of trade or geopolitical tensions. Colombia’s exposure to some of these tail risks has increased in line with larger foreign participation in the local government debt market. The IMF staff’s assessment is that Colombia continues to meet the qualification criteria for access to FCL resources.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This paper discusses Colombia’s Review Under the Flexible Credit Line (FCL). Colombia continues to have very strong economic fundamentals and institutional policy frameworks. The policy adjustment to permanently lower oil prices was timely and decisive. Tight monetary policy helped anchor inflation expectations in the face of large but temporary inflation shocks. The exchange rate continued to float. Fiscal policy tightened as prescribed by the fiscal rule, while protecting social and infrastructure spending. A structural tax reform, including a 3 percentage-point increase in the value-added tax, became effective in January 2017. The IMF staff recommends the completion of the review under the FCL arrangement for Colombia.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This paper discusses key issues related to the Colombian economy. Despite adverse global circumstances, Colombia’s successful policies and inclusive growth agenda continued in 2015. Colombia’s strong policy framework helped ensure an orderly adjustment to the deteriorated external conditions. Although the medium-term outlook is favorable, it is surrounded by downside risks. The main near-term risks stem from Colombia’s still significant near-term external financing needs and potential capital inflow reversals, the result of volatile global financial conditions. On the upside, bringing the peace process to fruition could further improve business confidence and capital inflows, reinforcing the recovery that will follow the necessary adjustment process.
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This paper discusses Jordan’s Sixth Review Under the Stand-By Arrangement, Request for Waivers of Applicability of Performance Criteria (PC), and Rephasing of Access. PC Program performance remains broadly on course. All end-March 2015 PCs are expected to be met. Structural performance saw improvement, including the pre-approval of a credit bureau and the establishment of a new public investment framework. There is an urgent need for broad-based policy actions in the labor market to put the unemployed into jobs, increase female labor force participation, and reform public-sector compensation and hiring practices. The IMF staff supports the completion of the sixth review and the related purchase.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
The economy has experienced seven consecutive years of robust growth, buoyed by high commodity prices, foreign direct investment and expansion of private sector credit. As part of a strategy to sustain growth, reduce poverty and curtail dependence on imported oil, the authorities are pursuing the Amaila Falls Hydro-electric Project (AFHP), entailing investment of about 30 percent of GDP. However, steps by Parliament that delayed important approvals led the private sector partner to withdraw, which could delay the project while additional financing is sought. Meanwhile, public debt remains high—around 60 percent of GDP—limiting the room to finance inclusive growth.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This paper discusses Colombia’s Review Under the Flexible Credit Line (FCL) Arrangement. Growth is projected to remain robust in 2014 and beyond, although risks are tilted to the downside. Real GDP is projected to grow at around potential in 2014 and over the medium term, with inflation remaining within the target range of 2–4 percent. However, Colombia remains vulnerable to external risks, including a sharp decline in oil prices and a surge in global financial market volatility. The IMF staff assesses that Colombia continues to meet the qualification criteria for access to FCL resources, and recommends completion of the review under the FCL arrangement for Colombia.