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International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The Legal Department and the Institute of the IMF held their ninth biennial seminar for legal advisors of IMF member countries’ central banks, and the papers published in this volume are based on presentations made by officials attending this seminar. The seminar covered a broad range of topics, including sovereign debt restructuring, money laundering and the financing of terrorism, financial system and banking supervision, conflicts of interest and market discipline in the financial sector, insolvency, and other issues related to central banking.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The main theme of Volume 5 in this series is law and financial stability. The chapters cover many topics that enhance the reader's understanding of financial stability, as well as the many instruments available to promote it. The contributors discuss and analyze a range of issues such as, competing responsibilities of central banks and the institutional responses to past episodes of instability; the reasons for and against regulating hedge funds and derivatives, and the methods available for doing so; and the contributions of deposit insurance schemes, payments systems and securities settlement systems towards achieving financial stability. The relationship between laws proscribing money laundering and the financing of terrorism and the goal of financial stability is also discussed. The chapters in this edited volume are based on presentations from the tenth biennial seminar for legal advisors of central banks and member countries organized by the Legal Department and Institute of the IMF. The chapter authors include scholars, lawyers, representatives from the private sector, as well as officials of the IMF, other international organizations, and central banks.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Globalization requires enhanced information flows among financial regulators. Standard-setting bodies for financial sector regulation provide extensive guidance, but financial sector assessments have often found that problems in cooperation and information exchange continue to constrain cross-border supervision and financial integrity oversight. In July 2004, the IMF organized a conference on cross-border cooperation for standard setters, financial intelligence units (FIUs), and financial regulatory agencies. This book brings together conference papers in which participants discuss: information exchange for an effective anti–money laundering/combating the financing of terrorism (AML/CFT) regime, in terms of both standards and practices; the standards for cooperation in the insurance sector; and the experiences of regulators from banking, securities, and unified regulatory agencies with international cooperation. The book also includes papers providing a general overview of international standards and their implementation and, on the basis of survey results, of practices among financial sector regulators and FIUs.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The Legal Department and the Institute of the IMF held their eighth biennial seminar for legal advisers of central banks of member countries on May 7-17,2000. The papers presented in this volume are based on presentations made by the seminar participants. The seminar covered a broad range of topics, including activities of the IMF and other international financial institutions, sovereign debt restructuring, the architecture of the international financial system, and money laundering and the financing of terrorism. In addition, participants addressed the role of central banks, payment systems, securities, technology in the financial sector, and monetary arrangements.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Hawala and other remittance systems have gained attention in recent years with the substantial growth of remittance flows from countries with large migrant labor forces and with increased focus on combating money laundering and the financing of terrorism. The IMF and the World Bank have been researching these systems since 2002 to better understand the interplay of historical, cultural, and economic factors that promote such systems. This book is a survey of regulatory practices and an overview of experiences in different countries, and includes articles on regulatory frameworks in remitting and receiving countries and on the problems that can arise when regulating remittance systems.

Maud J. Bökkerink

Abstract

Given the large turnover in the money remittance sector, money remittance offices are considered a significant part of the Dutch financial system. In addition, because it has emerged that money remittances can be misused for money laundering and terrorist financing, the Netherlands has found it necessary to regulate the money remittance providers.

Raúl Hernández-Coss

Abstract

In recent years, as remittance flows and funds transfer systems have become increasingly important for international policymakers, the broad concepts of remittance phenomena have become well documented. This essay compares the key features of two remittance corridors, identifying two distinct stages for inducing a comprehensive shift from informal to formal channels. The main source of analytical information is work conducted by the World Bank in support of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Remittance Initiative. Additional research could explore in more detail how the features of a given corridor should be addressed in implementing regulations and how operators in the formal sector can best reach remittance senders.

R. Barry Johnston

Abstract

The First International Conference on Hawala, hosted by the government of the United Arab Emirates under the leadership of the Central Bank of the U.A.E. in May 2002, was a groundbreaking event that produced the Abu Dhabi Declaration on Hawala. The IMF was very pleased that the government of the U.A.E., again with the leadership of the Central Bank, collaborated with the IMF to organize this second conference.

Andres Arboleda Uribe

Abstract

This paper discusses Colombia’s experience of implementing a regulatory framework for money transfers that is capable of attracting money remitters to cross the line to a formal system. It also describes the supervisory practices and procedures the country designed and has applied for the past 12 years to enforce those regulations.

Nikos Passas

Abstract

Hawala means “transfer” in Arabic and refers to a traditional informal and efficient funds transfer method used by millions of expatriates to send remittances to their families around the world. Several studies emphasize hawala’s economic and humanitarian significance. In the midst of calls to shut down all potential means used by militants to finance their terror, the First International Conference on Hawala, held in 2002 in Abu Dhabi, was successful in offering an opportunity to examine hawala beyond media sensationalism and rushed policy responses.