Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • Type: Journal Issue x
  • Seminar Volumes x
Clear All Modify Search
International Monetary Fund. Legal Dept.

Abstract

“Restoring Financial Stability-The Legal Response” is the theme of the sixth volume of “Current Developments in Monetary and Financial Law.” The book covers a range of issues: frameworks and regulatory reforms in the United States, European Union, and Japan that address systemic risk; the international dimension of financial stability; the regulation of complex financial products; cross-border banking supervision; capital adequacy; and corporate and household debt restructuring. The chapters are based on presentations from a seminar hosted by the IMF Legal Department, the Ministry of Finance of Japan, the Financial Services Agency of Japan, and the Bank of Japan, with the assistance of the IMF Institute. The contributors to the volume come from both the public and private sectors, and include academics, lawyers practicing in the fields of banking and financial law, and officials from central banks, supervisory and regulatory agencies, and standard-setting bodies.

Il SaKong and Mr. Olivier J Blanchard

Abstract

This volume presents papers from a conference organized by the Korea Development Institute and the IMF. The purpose of this high-level conference was for policymakers and academics from the Asian region and from G-20 countries to discuss forward-looking economic and financial issues of interest to the international community, such as restoring normalcy to fiscal policy, macroprudential regulation, the future of the financial system, global fiscal imbalances, and the international monetary system. Topics include: (1) A strategy for renormalizing fiscal and monetary policies in advanced economies. Key principles for restoring financial stability in the wake of the crisis, including the timing and sequence for exit, are identified. (2) Rethinking macroeconomic policy. This section examines if and how macroeconomic policy should respond to sectoral imbalances and asset-price and housing imbalances, as well as a potential role for macroprudential regulation. (3) Redesigning the financial system of the future. Responses by both policymakers and the private sector to recent events are evaluated in terms of how they will shape the future financial system and its role in the global economy. (4) Global imbalances. The argument is made that there is an urgent need to address the domestic and international distortions that are a key cause of imbalances; failure to do so would threaten the sustainability of the recovery. (5) The future of the international monetary system. Steps that can be taken to address the inherent weaknesses in the current system are described, including possible solutions on both the demand side and on the supply side.

Mr. Charles Enoch and Ms. Inci Ötker

Abstract

This volume represents the latest developments and policy debate on a very current issue: the rapid growth of banking sector credit to the private sector, which continues to occupy the minds of academics and policymakers alike in many central and eastern European (CEE) countries. The papers, presented by the representatives of international organizations and monetary and supervisory authorities of a number of western and CEE countries, provide discussions on how to assess and respond to excessive credit growth. Case studies represent the challenges faced by policymakers in dealing with rapid credit growth, providing useful lessons for other countries experiencing a similar phenomenon. For more information on how to purchase a copy of this title, please visit http://www.palgrave.com/economics/imf/index.asp.

Stefan Gerlach and Mr. Paul F. Gruenwald

Abstract

The procyclicality of financial systems has received an increasing amount of attention from policymakers, academics, and international organizations in recent years. This heightened interest stems from a combination of the ongoing globalization of finance, the role of the financial sector in various emerging market crises in the late 1990s, and the potential impact on financial sectors of the upcoming implementation of the Basel II accord. Some degree of financial sector procyclicality is a characteristic of any normally functioning economy. At issue is whether the observed procyclicality is excessive. The challenge is to define "excessive" and to identify policy measures that could produce superior economic outcomes. This volume attempts to do so by collecting recent work on procyclicality in Asian financial systems. For more information on how to purchase a copy of this title, please visit http://www.palgrave.com/economics/imf/index.asp.

Mr. Jian-Ye Wang and Mr. Márcio Valério Ronci

Abstract

Trade finance has long been an important component of international financial flows. Firms in emerging market economies, in particular, rely heavily on bank-financed trade credits to support their export and import activities. This book examines why and how much trade finance flows decline during financial crises, with case studies of several Asian and Latin American countries. The authors draw from the analysis to present options for mitigating trade finance declines in the event of future crises.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The Legal Department and the Institute of the IMF held their eighth biennial seminar for legal advisers of central banks of member countries on May 7-17,2000. The papers presented in this volume are based on presentations made by the seminar participants. The seminar covered a broad range of topics, including activities of the IMF and other international financial institutions, sovereign debt restructuring, the architecture of the international financial system, and money laundering and the financing of terrorism. In addition, participants addressed the role of central banks, payment systems, securities, technology in the financial sector, and monetary arrangements.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Hawala and other remittance systems have gained attention in recent years with the substantial growth of remittance flows from countries with large migrant labor forces and with increased focus on combating money laundering and the financing of terrorism. The IMF and the World Bank have been researching these systems since 2002 to better understand the interplay of historical, cultural, and economic factors that promote such systems. This book is a survey of regulatory practices and an overview of experiences in different countries, and includes articles on regulatory frameworks in remitting and receiving countries and on the problems that can arise when regulating remittance systems.

Ms. Andrea Schaechter, Mr. Piero Ugolini, and Mr. Mark R. Stone

Abstract

Increasing global financial market integration is presenting new challenges to central banks as they seek to attain low inflation and financial stability. This volume is based on a conference hosted by the IMF in September 2002. It examines key issues such as the choice of nominal anchor for countries susceptible to shifts in capital flows, what can be done to prevent and deal decisively with financial crises, and how central bankers should think about the difficult choices when monetary objectives and financial stability objectives come into conflict.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The papers published in this volume are based on an IMF seminar held in 2000 that covered a broad range of topics on monetary and financial law, such as the liberalization of capital movements, data dissemination, responsibilities of central banks, and the IMF’s goals in financial surveillance and architecture. Participants addressed recent issues in the financial sector, including those related to payment systems and supervision of financial institutions. Updates dealt with Internet banking, bank secrecy, and currency arrangements-including dollarization. Participants discussed the recent activities of the other international financial institutions, which included the European Central Bank and the International Finance Corporation. Prevention of financial crises was also discussed, with reference to the distinct roles of the IMF and the private sector.