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International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This paper analyzes Dominican Republic’s Request for Purchase Under the Rapid Financing Instrument (RFI). The RFI provides timely resources to the authorities which they intend to mobilize for essential coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-related health expenditure and support to the vulnerable population. The pandemic has significantly weakened the Dominican Republic’s macroeconomic outlook for 2020 and created financing needs that require additional support. The authorities are also seeking support from other multilateral institutions. Macroeconomic and financial policies have been accommodative in response to the pandemic. The temporary fiscal measures to accommodate higher public healthcare spending and targeted transfers to the most vulnerable are appropriate. The IMF emergency assistance under the RFI is expected to help provide the much-needed resources to address the urgent balance of payments needs and support essential COVID-19-related health expenditure. The support of other international financial institutions and development partners would be crucial to close the remaining financing gaps, ease the adjustment burden, and preserve the Dominican Republic’s dynamic economic growth.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This 2019 Article IV Consultation with Nicaragua highlights that social unrest and its aftermath eroded confidence and caused large capital and bank deposits outflows that resulted in a prolonged output contraction. Banks cut lending, which exacerbated the downturn. Faced with sharply lower revenues and a severe tightening in available financing, including on account of sanctions, the government was forced to cut spending and adopt a procyclical tax package. The economy is projected to continue to contract in the near term as it adjusts to weaker confidence and lower external financing. The sharp contraction in credit will continue to depress investment, and the tight fiscal and external financing situation will continue to drag down medium-term growth. The key risks relate to further erosion in confidence and renewed deposit outflows. The imposition of additional sanctions by trading partners could also heighten economic stress. It is recommended to maintain a conservative fiscal stance in 2020 remains the key to maintain macroeconomic stability. Curbing expenditures on goods and services will allow increased spending on social programs, social safety nets, and public investment, which would lead to more equitable and sustainable growth.
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This 2017 Article IV Consultation highlights that Pakistan’s outlook for economic growth is favorable. Real GDP is estimated at 5.3 percent in FY2016/17 and strengthening to 6 percent over the medium term on the back of stepped-up China Pakistan Economic Corridor investments, improved availability of energy, and growth-supporting structural reforms. Inflation has been gradually increasing but remains contained, and the financial sector has remained sound. Key external risks include lower trading partner growth, tighter international financial conditions, a faster rise in international oil prices, and over the medium term, failure to generate sufficient exports to meet rising external obligations from large-scale foreign-financed investments.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This 2017 Article IV Consultation highlights Colombia’s favorable outlook, underpinned by the peace agreement, structural tax reform, and the authorities’ infrastructure agenda. Economic activity will rebound slightly in 2017 as investment strengthens, boosted by reduced corporate taxation and confidence stemming from the peace agreement. Nontraditional exports are gaining steam thanks in part to ongoing efforts to reduce trade barriers, and this will help bring the current account deficit to its equilibrium level. Medium-term growth will be driven by economic diversification away from oil, which will benefit from the infrastructure agenda, and the peace agreement, which will improve competitiveness and regional development.