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International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This paper presents an assessment of the Observance of Insurance Core Principles in New Zealand. Observance of these principles in New Zealand falls significantly short. In some areas, the implementation of initiatives that would improve observance is incomplete. Supervisory risk assessment and enhancement of regulatory reporting by insurers are limited, which compromises effective off-site supervision, macroprudential analysis, and publication of aggregate information on the market. The Reserve Bank of New Zealand should focus in regulation and supervisory work on setting standards on corporate governance, risk management, and internal controls. It should assess risk in these areas to promote the effectiveness of insurers’ governance.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This paper discusses findings and recommendations of the Report on Observance of Standards and codes for Ireland. The Central Bank of Ireland (CBI) is the integrated financial supervisor in Ireland. As the primary regulator of the Irish financial system, CBI has overall responsibility for the supervision of insurers and insurance intermediaries authorized in Ireland. The authorities need to address the significant challenges faced by CBI in attracting and retaining supervisors and to enhance the CBI’s independence. CBI is also advised to review the supervisory risk appetite underpinning Probability Risk Impact Supervisory System, including potential reputational risks.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This paper discusses findings of the Detailed Assessment of Observance on Insurance Core Principles on Singapore. The insurance industry in Singapore is growing, in particular the offshore nonlife sector. Gross premium of the sector has grown significantly by more than 80 percent in the last five years. The Monetary Authority of Singapore has made significant progress in improving the insurance regulatory regime and supervisory practice since the initial Financial Sector Assessment Program in 2004.The updated regulatory framework and supervisory practices have a significantly high level of observance of the Insurance Core Principles.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
Nigeria undertook a Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP), which included a review of the structure of Nigeria’s insurance market and the supervisory framework. The assessment was benchmarked against the Insurance Core Principles (ICPs) issued by the International Association of Insurance Supervisors (IAISs). It is advised that the National Insurance Commission (NAICOM) of Nigeria can expand the objective to include the creation of a fair, safe, and stable insurance sector for the benefit and protection of policyholders.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This report is an analysis of the insurance core principles of Malaysia. This assessment gives a clear understanding of the regulatory and supervisory framework of the insurance sector of Malaysia. Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM) is the best insurance regulator in this region. Six percent of the financial sector accounts for the insurance sector. The assessment did not reveal any current potential sources of significant risk to the Malaysian financial stability from its insurance industry. The Executive Board expects further enhancement for an effective insurance sector.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses key findings of the Detailed Assessment of Observance of International Association of Insurance Supervisors (IAIS) Insurance Core Principles for the United States. Most U.S. insurers write primary insurance on U.S. risks. The U.S. market is characterized by low market concentration in most sectors, indicating a high degree of competition. Overall, the insurance sector, and the property and casualty companies in particular, has been resilient through the financial crisis. However, there have also been significant stresses in the insurance sector in the last two years.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses findings of the assessment of Financial Sector Supervision and Regulation on the Cayman Islands. The assessment reveals that substantial progress has been made in the implementation of the 2003 Offshore Financial Center assessment recommendations, including, importantly, regarding Cayman Islands Monetary Authority’s independence and resources. There is scope for enhancing regulatory reporting and disclosure requirements by financial entities, such as shortening the period for filing required documents and requiring all insurers to disclose their use of derivatives and similar commitments regularly.
International Monetary Fund
This paper presents a Detailed Assessment of the Isle of Man’s (IOM) observance of the Insurance Core Principles. Regulation has been strengthened since the 2003 Offshore Financial Center assessment. The Insurance and Pension Authority has been putting in place Memorandums of Understanding with home regulators and is exchanging information extensively. After rapid growth in 2005 and 2006, new business volumes and investment performance have been adversely affected by weaker global equity markets. The number of captives established in the IOM has fallen, reflecting competition from jurisdictions within the European Union.
International Monetary Fund
This report presents a Detailed Assessment of the Observance of the Insurance Core Principles Report on Jersey. Other than the international business, most cover is obtained from insurers based overseas by the large insurance broker community on the island. There is no ombudsman and no policyholder compensation arrangements for insurance business on the island. Jersey has its own company’s legislation, but has no local accounting or actuarial standard-setting bodies and it looks to other jurisdictions, especially the United Kingdom, for its framework of accounting, auditing, and actuarial standards.
International Monetary Fund
This paper presents an assessment of Financial Sector Supervision and Regulation for Bermuda. The Bermudian authorities have made impressive progress in developing and implementing a risk-focused approach to supervision across the range of their sectoral supervisory responsibilities. Full rollout of the risk-based regulatory system to all market segments is, however, required for achievement of comprehensive oversight of the market. To support the introduction of a formal risk-based supervisory system, the banking department has been restructured.