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International Monetary Fund
This paper reports on the Fund’s income position for FY 2020 following the closing of the Fund’s accounts for the financial year and completion of the external audit. Net operational income was about SDR 1.4 billion, slightly higher than estimated in the April supplement, mainly reflecting higher investment income. However, the unrealized pension-related adjustment in FY 2020, stemming mainly from the actuarial remeasurement of staff retirement plan assets and liabilities, was larger than previously estimated and more than offset the Fund’s net operational income, contributing to an overall net loss of about SDR 1.4 billion for the year.
International Monetary Fund. Office of Budget and Planning
The paper presents highlights from the FY 2020 budget, followed by a discussion of outputs based on the Fund Thematic Categories and of inputs.
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This Joint Staff Advisory Note on the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper discusses that Somalia has made noteworthy progress since 2012 to recover from decades of conflict and state fragmentation. The country has succeeded in rebuilding core state capabilities and organized two democratic national elections in 2012 and 2017. Somalia has now reached the stage where it seeks to fully reengage the international community and is requesting debt relief through the heavily indebted poor countries initiative. The authorities developed the Ninth National Development Plan (NPD9) through a highly consultative, participatory process that ensured full country ownership. The macroeconomic policy objectives of NDP9 are to promote economic growth in an environment of low inflation, sustainable fiscal and current account balances, and healthy foreign exchange reserves. The IMF staff recommends updating framework to incorporate greater support for poverty reduction and additional financing from development partners during the interim period. The IMF staff supports the authorities’ commitment to issuing new Somali shilling banknotes, while maintaining de facto dollarization.
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This 2017 Article IV Consultation highlights that despite a severe drought and sporadic terrorist attacks, Somalia avoided a significant economic slowdown in 2017 with support from the national and international community. Economic activity in 2017 is expected to have slowed. The drought that hit the country since late 2016 has receded, but it took a considerable toll, particularly in the remote areas. GDP growth is projected to have remained subdued at 1.8 percent in 2017. Driven by higher food prices, year-over-year inflation increased to 5.2 percent at the end of December 2017. A small budget surplus was achieved by the end of September 2017, even though domestic revenue fell short of the program target.
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
KEY ISSUES Context: Somalia is a fragile state emerging from a protracted civil war. In 1991, the government was toppled by armed opposition groups, leading to implosion of the central government and devolution of power to administrative regions. The Fund recognized the Federal Government of Somalia on April 12, 2013, paving the way for staff to provide policy advice and technical assistance. While Somalia has been welcomed back as an active member of the Fund, it remains ineligible for financial assistance pending the clearance of its longstanding arrears. The political and security situation remains challenging. Complex clan politics and high turnover in the members of the economic team have undermined policymaking. A new government took office on February 18, 2015, and presidential elections are planned for September 2016. Key policy issues: The Article IV discussions focused on immediate and medium-term actions for building institutions and policy frameworks for fiscal and financial management. Specifically, • Capacity building and governance. Concerted action is needed to build institutions and improve governance in order to support sustainable, inclusive growth, and poverty reduction. In particular, urgent efforts are required to set in place sound mechanisms and institutions to ensure that prospective natural resource wealth, notably hydrocarbons, is well managed. Considerable donor assistance is required for helping Somalia to meet these daunting challenges. • Fiscal. Decisive steps are necessary to build fiscal discipline, underpinned by realistic budgeting and effective implementation systems, including commitment controls. The 2015 budget needs to be revised in light of revenue shortfalls. An emergency revenue mobilization plan and an expenditure review are warranted. • Financial sector. Efforts are needed to develop the currently rudimentary financial system. Swift action is required so that remittances can be channeled through the international banking system. Currency reform should not be implemented until prerequisites are in place. Given the extent of dollarization and the absence of monetary policy instruments, the central bank is unable to conduct monetary policy. Past IMF advice: The latest Article IV consultation was on November 13, 1989, and focused on the low priority attached by the government in place then on the need for better controlling unproductive spending, and on the need for better economic and social services.
International Monetary Fund
This review examines experience in implementing the lessons drawn in the 2011 Board paper on the Fund’s engagement with countries in post-conflict and fragile situations (more commonly referred to as fragile states (FS)) and the ensuing 2012 Guidance Note. The focus is on capacity building, Fund facilities and program design, and policy support. The review identifies scope to improve the Fund’s engagement in selected areas.
International Monetary Fund. Secretary's Department

Abstract

Siete años después del estallido de la crisis financiera mundial, al mundo aún le queda mucho camino por recorrer para lograr una recuperación sostenida caracterizada por un crecimiento vigoroso que propicie una rápida creación de empleo y que beneficie a todos, señala la Directora Gerente del Fondo Monetario Internacional (FMI), Christine Lagarde, en el prefacio del Informe Anual de 2014, De la estabilización a un crecimiento sostenido, que la institución publica el día de hoy. “La recuperación está en marcha, pero sigue siendo demasiado lenta y frágil, y está a merced del estado de ánimo de los agentes financieros. Hay millones de personas que siguen buscando trabajo. La incertidumbre quizás esté disminuyendo, pero no cabe decir que esté desapareciendo”. Lagarde explica que “A lo largo de la crisis y durante la recuperación, el FMI ha sido, y sigue siendo, un agente indispensable de cooperación económica” para los países miembros. El informe relata la labor desplegada por el Directorio Ejecutivo del FMI y presenta los informes financieros correspondientes al ejercicio comprendido entre el 1 de mayo de 2013 y el 30 de abril de 2014. El informe describe el apoyo que el FMI brinda a sus 188 países miembros, haciendo hincapié en las funciones básicas de la institución: evaluar las políticas económicas y financieras de los países, proporcionar financiamiento cuando sea necesario y fortalecer las capacidades en aspectos fundamentales de la política económica.

International Monetary Fund. Secretary's Department

Abstract

Seven years after the onset of the global financial crisis, the world still has a way to go to secure a sustainable recovery marked by strong growth that supports rapid job creation and benefits all, International Monetary Fund (IMF) Managing Director Christine Lagarde says in her foreword to the institution’s Annual Report 2014—From Stabilization to Sustainable Growth, published today. “The recovery is ongoing, but it is still too slow and fragile, subject to the vagaries of financial sentiment. Millions of people are still looking for work. The level of uncertainty might be diminishing, but it is certainly not disappearing.” Ms. Lagarde said that “throughout the crisis and in the recovery period, the IMF has been, and continues to be, an indispensible agent of economic cooperation” for its membership. The report covers the work of the IMF’s Executive Board and contains financial statements for the year May 1, 2013, to April 30, 2014. It describes the IMF’s support for its 188 member countries, with an emphasis on the core areas of IMF responsibility: assessing their economic and financial policies, providing financing where needed, and building capacity in key areas of economic policy.

International Monetary Fund. Secretary's Department

Abstract

Seven years after the onset of the global financial crisis, the world still has a way to go to secure a sustainable recovery marked by strong growth that supports rapid job creation and benefits all, International Monetary Fund (IMF) Managing Director Christine Lagarde says in her foreword to the institution’s Annual Report 2014—From Stabilization to Sustainable Growth, published today. The recovery is ongoing, but it is still too slow and fragile, subject to the vagaries of financial sentiment. Millions of people are still looking for work. The level of uncertainty might be diminishing, but it is certainly not disappearing.” Ms. Lagarde said that “throughout the crisis and in the recovery period, the IMF has been, and continues to be, an indispensible agent of economic cooperation” for its membership. The report covers the work of the IMF’s Executive Board and contains financial statements for the year May 1, 2013, to April 30, 2014. It describes the IMF’s support for its 188 member countries, with an emphasis on the core areas of IMF responsibility: assessing their economic and financial policies, providing financing where needed, and building capacity in key areas of economic policy.