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International Monetary Fund
While growth in advanced economies is losing momentum amid trade tensions and policy uncertainty, activity in many emerging and low-income developing countries (EMDEs) has remained more robust, supported by still favorable financing conditions. Differences across EMDEs are large, however, and downside risks are building. Policy priorities include enhancing resilience in response to a more challenging global environment, creating fiscal space for essential development spending, containing debt vulnerabilities, and promoting strong and inclusive growth. Strengthening revenue generating capacity, enhancing public spending efficiency, and addressing infrastructure gaps are critical for reaching the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

Abstract

Growth in sub-Saharan Africa has recovered relative to 2016, but the momentum is weak and per capita incomes are expected to barely increase. Further, vulnerabilities have risen in many countries, adding to the urgency of implementing the fiscal consolidations planned in most countries and with stepped up efforts to strengthen growth.

International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

Abstract

Growth in sub-Saharan Africa has recovered relative to 2016, but the momentum is weak and per capita incomes are expected to barely increase. Further, vulnerabilities have risen in many countries, adding to the urgency of implementing the fiscal consolidations planned in most countries and with stepped up efforts to strengthen growth.

International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This paper discusses Tunisia’s Request for an Extension of the Stand-By Arrangement. The sixth review, originally scheduled to take place before end-March 2015, was delayed. Although quantitative performance criteria for end-December 2014 and end-March 2015 are likely to have been met, the structural reform agenda did not advance as expected, mainly reflecting the authorities’ focus on the formation of a coalition government and the approval of internal regulations for the newly elected parliament. The adoption of long-awaited legislation necessary to promote more inclusive growth and reduce vulnerabilities remains outstanding in many areas. The IMF staff supports the authorities’ request for an extension of the arrangement until December 31, 2015.
International Monetary Fund
The purpose of the monitoring and evaluation process is to determine to what extent proposed actions/sub-actions have been accomplished, and to take policy corrective action to accomplish the objectives of the National Development Strategy. Monitoring and evaluation is done on the basis of process and performance indicators. The monitoring process will generate progress reports and will be reported at sixth-month intervals. A report on the evaluation of the National Development Strategy will be prepared at the end of each year of implementation.
International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper on Papua New Guinea reports that although economic cycles have generally paralleled the many mineral sector booms and busts, the downward trend in growth rates may reflect other factors. Papua New Guinea’s economy is dominated by a large labor-intensive agricultural sector and a capital-intensive oil and minerals sector. The formal sector consists of enclave extractive industries, cash crop production, and a small, import-substituting manufacturing sector. The importance of the agriculture sector is about the same as at independence, reflecting structural impediments that have deterred more rapid growth.