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International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This paper presents Selected Decisions and Selected Documents’ Third Issue of the IMF. Dealings in paper money and coins are deemed to be ‘other exchange transactions’ within the meaning of Article IV, Section 3, whether or not the importation and exportation of such money and coins to and from the country of origin are subject to restrictions. The IMF does not object to exchange rates which are within 2 percent of parity for spot exchange transactions between a member's currency and the currencies of other members taking place within the member's territories, whenever such rates result from the maintenance of margins of no more than 1 percent from parity for a convertible, including externally convertible, currency. The Executive Directors interpret the Articles of Agreement to mean that steps which are necessary to protect a member from unemployment of a chronic or persistent character, arising from pressure on its balance of payments, are among the measures necessary to correct a fundamental disequilibrium; and that in each instance in which a member proposes a change in the par value of its currency to correct a fundamental disequilibrium the IMF will be required to determine, in the light of all relevant circumstances, whether in its opinion the proposed change is necessary to correct the fundamental disequilibrium.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This paper analyses several IMF’s selected decisions of the Executive Board and selected documents. Each member shall furnish to the IMF the data necessary to determine its net official holdings of gold and United States dollars. The usability of gold or dollars for the payment of the gold subscription is not necessary to constitute “holdings.” It has been decided to recommend to the Board of Governors, where a member presents, for reasons which it shall submit to the IMF, that its reserves should not be reduced by an immediate 25 percent gold payment, that such member shall be permitted in accordance with an appropriate resolution to have its quota increased in five annual installments, with the right to accelerate the payment of such installments. In June 1947, the IMF issued a statement recommending to its members that they take effective action to prevent external transactions in gold at premium prices, because such transactions tend to undermine exchange stability and to impair monetary reserves.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This paper explains various selected decisions of the IMF’s Executive Directors. The IMF has examined certain problems relating to the adjustment of its holdings of fluctuating currencies and to transactions and computations involving such currencies and has come to several conclusions. The IMF does not intend to apply the rules set forth in in the section II to its holdings of members' currencies having fluctuating rates when there is no practical interest for the IMF or members to do so. Whenever the IMF revalues its holdings of a fluctuating currency under paragraph 3, it will establish an account receivable or an account payable in respect of the amount of the currency payable by or to the member under Article IV, Section 8. Despite the improvement in the payments position of many members, sound gold and exchange policy of members continues to require that to the maximum extent practicable, gold should be held in official reserves rather than go into private hoards.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

1. This agreement, which is entered into by the United Nations pursuant to the provisions of Article 63 of its Charter, and by the International Monetary Fund (hereinafter called the Fund), pursuant to the provisions of Article X of its Articles of Agreement, is intended to define the terms on which the United Nations and the Fund shall be brought into relationship.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The request for interpretation of the Articles of Agreement referred to the Executive Directors by Resolution No. 7 of the Board of Governors was considered. . . . It was unanimously agreed that Sections 3(b)(i)and 3(f) of Article XII should be interpreted to mean that any member having one of the five largest quotas at the date of the regular election or at any date between regular elections shall be entitled to appoint an Executive Director who will hold office until the next regular election without prejudice to the right of a subsequently admitted member to appoint a Director if it has one of the five largest quotas.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

In order to enable the International Monetary Fund to fulfill more effectively its role in the international monetary system, the main industrial countries have agreed that they will, in a spirit of broad and willing cooperation, strengthen the Fund by general arrangements under which they will stand ready to make loans to the Fund up to specified amounts under Article VII, Section 1 of the Articles of Agreement when supplementary resources are needed to forestall or cope with an impairment of the international monetary system. In order to give effect to these intentions, the following terms and conditions are adopted under Article VII, Section 1 of the Articles of Agreement.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

1. Pursuant to Article V, Section 6(b) and (c), the Fund shall provide a member at its request with SDRs from the General Resources Account in exchange for an equivalent amount of the currencies of other members to enable the member to pay SDRs in order to increase its quota under Board of Governors Resolution No. 34-2 on the Seventh General Review of Quotas or in accordance with the provisions of that Resolution.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

During the discussions on the World Economic Outlook, Directors touched on the issue of military spending in the context of the need to raise global savings and to help meet new investment demands. The scale of global resources devoted to military spending—estimated at nearly 5 percent of world GDP—underscores its importance. In the more recent discussion on Military Expenditure and the Role of the Fund, most Directors indicated that as military expenditures can have an important bearing on a member’s fiscal policy and external position, information about such expenditures may be necessary to permit a full and internally consistent assessment of the member’s economic position and policies. At the same time, Directors emphasized that national security, and judgments regarding the appropriate level of military expenditures required to assure that security, were a sovereign prerogative of national governments and were not in the domain of the work of the Fund.