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International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The change of regime in Cuba in 1959 led to a considerable migration of citizens from that country. Many of these émigrés held insurance policies issued by U.S. or Canadian companies that had been doing business in Cuba. A wave of litigation based on these policies flooded into courts in the United States against both groups of companies.1 One company alone had more than 6,000 policies outstanding that had been issued through its Havana branch. “The pending suits involve all kinds of policy claims, including death claims, suits for cash surrender values of policies, annuity benefits and endowment proceeds, as well as actions to force insurers to accept premiums and maintain policies in force.” 2

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

In 1945 the defendant company, a Louisiana corporation, issued to the plaintiff three single premium annuity contracts under which his daughters were the annuitants and under which monthly payments were to begin as each of the plaintiff’s three daughters reached the age of 21. The signatures of the defendant’s officials executing the policies were authenticated before a notary in Havana, and the policies were delivered to the plaintiff there on payment of the premium in dollars by the plaintiff. The contracts provided that the annuities were to be paid in dollars, and that all liquidations were to be paid at the defendant’s head office in New Orleans on delivery of the contract to the defendant. The plaintiff, who was vested with control of the contract, demanded its cash surrender value in Florida after he became a resident of that state. On the defendant’s refusal to pay, the plaintiff sued and the defendant counterclaimed for a declaratory judgment of nonliability. One policy matured in May 1957 before suit was brought, and another in May 1961 in the course of the litigation.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

A fundamental question raised by the cases is the relation of Article VIII, Section 2(b), to private international law. That branch of the law of each country includes a set of rules that determine the law by which contracts, including their performance, are governed. Article VIII, Section 2(b), also establishes a rule for the recognition of certain provisions of a particular system of law. It declares that, if suit is brought in a member’s court to enforce an exchange contract, the court must refuse enforcement if the contract is contrary to the exchange control regulations of another member whose currency is involved. In short, the law of the member whose currency is involved must be recognized in the circumstances and for the purpose prescribed by Article VIII, Section 2(b).

International Monetary Fund
This paper on the Republic of Congo’s staff-monitored program (SMP) reports that the authorities and civil society pledged to work together to make resource management more transparent. The authorities have reached understandings with IMF staff on an SMP for April-September 2007. The SMP aims at making progress toward fiscal sustainability, enhancing public financial management, and improving governance and transparency. A solid track record of policy implementation in the context of the SMP would pave the way for discussions on a Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility arrangement to resume by end-2007.
International Monetary Fund
This consultation paper explains that in addition to the adverse impact of the global slowdown and higher commodity prices, St. Vincent and the Grenadines has been hit by two successive natural disasters in the last 12 months. As a result, real GDP has been contracted by a cumulative 4.7 percent since 2007 and is expected to remain slightly negative this year. Growth is expected to improve gradually toward its potential, but significant downside risks remain, largely related to developments in the global economy.
International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.
This paper discusses impact of purchasing power on deferred payments. The importance of the economic consequences for the economy of the adoption of purchasing power guarantees would, of course, depend on the range within which these guarantees were applied. Any practical proposals are therefore predicated on the assumption that, for the country in question, there is uncertainty about future general price movements. The problem which purchasing power guarantees are intended to solve is shown in its simplest form in the settlement of a private debt. In countries suffering from inflation, the improvement in the lender–borrower relationship would also be strengthened, since, with a purchasing power clause in the contract, the stigma of usury that would attach to any attempt to insist on high nominal rates of interest in order to ensure a proper real return would be avoided. The legal and social sanctions against usury in money terms give rise to a paradox in discussing the use of a purchasing power clause. The analytical discussion seems to show that, if anything, the borrower would gain more than the lender from the use of the clause—simply because interest payments are likely to be larger relative to his net income, and to have their real value stabilized would have a greater stabilizing effect on real income.
International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.
This paper focuses on various aspects of inflation in Latin America. Among short-run factors, World War II considerably affected the balance of payments of Latin American countries and thus indirectly their inflationary situation. Inflation in a greater or less degree has long been characteristic of many Latin American countries. A high propensity to consume implies either a high multiplier or a high propensity to import. In normal times, the latter was more usual, since the supply of consumers' goods in these countries was rather inelastic. In countries where controls over consumption and investment are strict and efficient, there is a tendency for inflation to give rise to substantial holdings of cash, bank deposits, and other relatively liquid assets in excess of those which would voluntarily be held by business and consumers. In countries such as those of Latin America, where controls have not been very effective, this tendency toward excess liquidity is noticeably smaller. Nevertheless, it is still a factor to reckon with, because involuntary hoarding may be the result of the impossibility of obtaining desired commodities or supplies, even though there is no rationing or similar system in operation. In Latin America during the war the inevitable curtailment of imports did in this way bring about a condition of latent inflation.