Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 209 items for :

  • Asia and Pacific x
  • Financial Economics x
  • Financial instruments x
  • Refine By Language: English x
Clear All
Mr. Jose M Cartas and Mrs. Qi He

Abstract

1.1 The Handbook on Securities Statistics (the Handbook) is the first publication of its kind to deal exclusively with the presentation of securities statistics. The objective of the Handbook is to improve information on securities markets. It develops a conceptual framework for presenting statistics on different types of securities. The methodology is based on the System of National Accounts 2008 (2008 SNA) and the sixth edition of the Balance of Payments and International Investment Position Manual (BPM6).

Mr. Johan Mathisen and Mr. Anthony J. Pellechio

Abstract

A distinguishing feature of emerging market crises in the 1990s and early 2000s was the sudden disruption in the capital accounts of key sectors of the economy. Capital account crises typically occur as creditors quickly lose confidence, prompting sudden and large-scale portfolio adjustments such as massive withdrawals of bank deposits, panic sales of securities, or abrupt halts of debt rollovers. As the exchange rate, interest rates, and other asset prices adjust, the balance sheet of an entire economy can sharply deteriorate.

Mr. Jose M Cartas and Artak Harutyunyan

Abstract

1.1 The main purpose of the Monetary and Financial Statistics Manual and Compilation Guide (Manual) is to offer guidelines for the compilation and presentation of monetary statistics, with compilers and users of such statistics as its focal target audience. Additionally, the Manual provides an orientation to the financial statistics framework. The Manual is also useful to compilers and users of other macroeconomic statistics in understanding the relationships among the various macroeconomic datasets.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

1.1 The Monetary and Financial Statistics: Compilation Guide is aimed at providing direct assistance to data compilers who are responsible at the national level for implementing the methodology and statistical frameworks contained in the Monetary and Financial Statistics Manual (MFSM; IMF, 2000b). This Guide, like the MFSM, should also be useful to compilers working in other areas of macroeconomic statistics, as well to those users who are interested in the origins and computational elements of the monetary and financial data that they are analyzing.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

1.1 The purpose of the External Debt Statistics: Guide for Compilers and Users (the Guide) is to provide comprehensive guidance for the measurement and presentation of external debt statistics. It also provides advice on the compilation of these data and on their analytical use. The intention is to contribute to both an improvement in, and a greater understanding of, external debt statistics. In doing so, the Guide is responding to the concerns of markets and policymakers for better external debt statistics to help assess external vulnerabilities at a time when increasing international capital flows are resulting in greater market interdependence.

International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

Abstract

1.1 The purpose of the External Debt Statistics: Guide for Compilers and Users (Guide) is to provide comprehensive guidance for the measurement and presentation of external debt statistics. The Guide also provides advice on the compilation of these statistics and on their analytical use. The intention is to contribute to both an improvement in, and a greater understanding of, external debt statistics. In doing so, the Guide is responding to the concerns of markets and policymakers for better external debt statistics to help assess external vulnerabilities at a time when increasing international capital flows are resulting in greater market interdependence. It is also responding to the users’ interest in improving the availability and international comparability of external debt statistics.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

10.1 External debt statistics can be compiled from a variety of sources, using a range of methods. Statistics can be collected from the debtor, from the creditor, or indirectly through information from financial intermediaries in the form of surveys, regulatory reports, and/or from other government administrative records. But a precondition for reliable and timely statistics is that the country has a strong and well-organized institutional setting for the compilation of statistics on public debt—so that all public and publicly guaranteed debt is well monitored and managed (see UNCTAD, 1993)—and private debt, and for the compilation of aggregate external debt statistics.

International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

Abstract

10.1 External debt statistics can be compiled from a variety of sources, using a range of methods. Statistics can be collected from the debtor, from the creditor, or indirectly through information from financial intermediaries in the form of surveys, regulatory reports, and/or from other government administrative records. But a precondition for reliable and timely statistics is that the country has a strong and well-organized institutional setting for the compilation of statistics on public debt—so that all public and publicly guaranteed debt is well monitored and managed—and private debt, and for the compilation of aggregate external debt statistics. 1 To this end, the institutional setting should ensure that: (1) the responsibility for collecting, processing, and disseminating the statistics is clearly specified; (2) data sharing and coordination among data-producing agencies are adequate; (3) individual reporters’ data are kept confidential and used for statistical purposes only; and (4) statistical reporting is supported through legal mandate and/or measures to encourage response.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

11.1 The Guide recommends that the collection of data on a government’s external debt be linked to the work of those responsible for managing the government’s debt position, for the purposes of administrative efficiency and quality control. Those responsible for government debt are invariably a government debt office, either within the ministry of finance or constituted as a separate agency within the government sector, or the central bank, or another government agency. For reasons outlined in the previous chapter, it is also important that the agency responsible for government data cooperate, as appropriate, with any other agencies involved with the compilation of external debt data.