Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 176 items for :

  • International Economics x
  • Society and Social Sciences x
  • Refine By Language: English x
Clear All

Abstract

The prospects for Arab economic development in the nineties is a highly complex subject that does not easily lend itself to generalizations valid for all countries. As is well known, the countries of the region vary greatly. For the oil countries, development will depend to a very large extent on what happens in the oil markets. Despite intensive efforts to diversify their economies, these countries are still heavily dependent on oil as the major source of income. Other countries may not be so heavily dependent on oil, but a good part of their growth is derived from the oil countries through workers’ remittances, development assistance, and Arab investment and trade. Still another group of countries is only remotely affected by the fortunes of the oil countries and is more concerned with developments in the export markets for their principal products. In addition to variations based on oil resources, Arab countries differ a great deal with respect to levels of development, per capita incomes, whether they export or import capital, and the extent to which they follow inward-looking or export-oriented development strategies. These variations complicate the task of assessing development prospects in the current decade.

Milan Zavadjil

Abstract

The economy of the West Bank and Gaza Strip faced a difficult external environment in 1997. Two intensified (and at times total) border closures that were triggered by security incidents in Israel jolted the economy, which was already weakened by high unemployment and permanent border controls that raised transportation and other costs, distorted investment incentives, and undermined competitiveness. The closures, coupled with the lack of progress in the peace process, gave rise to a profound pessimism concerning the economic prospects of the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The loss in confidence constrained both private investment and consumption, while public investment continued to be constrained by a broad array of factors, most of which reflected the unfavorable political and security situation. As a result, GNP increased by only 2 percent in real terms, implying a significant drop in per capita income.

James M. Boughton and K. Sarwar Lateef

Abstract

On July 1–22,1944, delegates from 44 nations met at Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, to design a framework for future international economic cooperation. Faced with an exceedingly ambitious agenda—to agree on fundamental principles, to design a set of institutions capable of furthering those principles, and to draft the Articles of Agreement to govern those institutions—these delegates managed in just three weeks to realize nearly all of their goals. That “political miracle,” as Richard Gardner calls it (in Chapter 4 of this volume), was all the more remarkable for having been accomplished in the midst of a global war by delegates from countries with broadly diverse experiences and objectives. The design of the Articles was largely the product of the British and U.S. delegations, but many other countries—China, France, and India are prominent examples—put their stamp on the final product. As Jacques Polak—one of several veterans of Bretton Woods who gathered 50 years later in Madrid—noted in a tribute (see Box), for all who were there in 1944 it was one of the most intense experiences, perhaps the defining experience, of their professional lives. And “Bretton Woods” entered the lexicon as a symbol of international economic cooperation and stability.

A.P. C J and S J. P

Abstract

Mozambique is a success story in sub-Saharan Africa. It has benefited from sustained large foreign aid inflows, strong and broad-based growth, and deep poverty reduction. Since its civil war ended in 1992, Mozambique’s growth record has been impressive, and its growth has especially benefited the poor: consumption among people below the poverty line has grown strongly, thanks to an expanding agricultural sector, increased nonfarm activities in rural areas, and higher wages. Today, Mozambique has one of the lowest levels of income inequality in Africa, and its absolute poverty and the poverty gap (which takes into account the distance separating the poor from the poverty line) have decreased substantially. (See Figure 1.1.) This remarkable growth performance was made possible by prudent macroeconomic policies, structural reform, and substantial donor assistance. On the political side, Mozambique has succeeded in bringing about reconciliation and solidifying its nascent democracy through three general and presidential elections.1

Abstract

The third and final keynote speaker was Jacques de Larosière, President of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, former Managing Director of the IMF, and former Governor of the Banque de France. Introducing Mr. de Larosière’s speech on stabilization and reform of the international monetary system was Hans Tietmeyer, President of the Deutsche Bundesbank.

S M

Abstract

Mozambique has experienced impressive economic growth over the past decade. GDP growth has averaged about 8 percent a year, which compares favorably with the growth takeoffs of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Thailand (the four members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations referred to in this book as the ASEAN-4) and other Asian countries in the mid-1970s (see Chapter 1).

Abstract

The final afternoon began with a session on the role of IMF surveillance and, more specifically, on the functioning of the international monetary system. Two of the featured speakers had served in the late 1980s as deputies to their country’s finance minister for the international economic cooperation and surveillance activities of the Group of Seven: Canada’s Wendy Dobson and Japan’s Toyoo Gyohten. Ms. Dobson subsequently became Professor of Economics at the University of Toronto and authored a book on international economic cooperation for the Institute for International Economics; Mr. Gyohten became Chairman of the Bank of Tokyo and co-authored a book on international cooperation with Paul Volcker. The third speaker, Jacob Frenkel, participated in the work of the Group of Seven in his capacity as Economic Counsellor and Director of Research at the IMF before leaving that post to become Governor of the Bank of Israel. The session was chaired by Maria Schaumayer, Governor of the Austrian National Bank.