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International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This 2014 Article IV Consultation highlights that Niger’s overall macroeconomic performance has been broadly satisfactory. After the economic slowdown in 2013 owing to the regional security situation and adverse climatic conditions, economic growth has rebounded in 2014. Inflation has been contained, in part owing to the government’s efforts to improve food security and the functioning of food markets. However, program performance has been mixed, as a combination of unexpected security and food expenditures and a shortfall in external financing have strained fiscal management. In the near term, containing the fiscal deficit through measures to improve tax policy and administration, reform customs administration, and reduce exemptions is essential to ensure sustainability.
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This paper examines the Islamic Republic of Mauritania’s adoption of its third Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) action plan, covering the medium term (2011–2015). Poverty reduction as the ultimate objective of all of the country’s economic social and institutional development policies has informed the context in which the third action plan is being implemented. The safe drinking water supply rate reached 52 percent nationally. In urban areas, the rate of access to private water main connections was 35 percent although it varied significantly from town to town. During the first year of implementation of the PRSP III, significant progress was made with actions targeting good governance and capacity-building in all areas of governance.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
Niger’s new Poverty Reduction Strategy (PDES) represents its overarching reference framework for the government’s development agenda. It also proposes changes in policy orientation and institutional arrangements to respond to recent developments in Niger and in the subregion. The PDES was developed in an inclusive participatory process. Overall, it provides a comprehensive analysis of development challenges and a plan to achieve accelerated sustainable growth, identifies key risks to the achievements of the objectives as well as mitigating measures.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
The number of Malian refugees in Burkina Faso has increased, but the government’s contribution remains in line with earlier estimates. Growth for 2012 has been revised upward to 8 percent. The overall fiscal deficit is significantly lower than anticipated. The current account is expected to improve next year. There is significant improvement in revenue collection. The authorities are stepping up efforts to improve resilience to shocks. Efforts are under way to improve debt management capacity. The mining taxation regime needs to rebalance the interests of investors.
International Monetary Fund
Guinea’s 2007–10 Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper is intended to reestablish strong, sustainable economic growth in a favorable political and institutional context. The percentage of underweight children under age five has increased from 25.8 percent in 2005 to 26.1 percent in 2008, indicating a slight increase in malnutrition. The coverage of vaccination against measles for children under age one declined from 85.3 percent in 2007 to 65.4 percent in 2008. The number of health centers nationwide remains unsatisfactory despite a modest increase from 399 in 2007 to 410 in 2009.
International Monetary Fund
This 2009 Article IV Consultation on Timor-Leste highlights that the Timorese economy has posted high economic growth over the past two years, driven by rapid increases in government spending and a recovery in agriculture from a 2007 drought. Central government spending rose sharply in 2008, reflecting efforts to address pressing development needs and secure social cohesion. Executive Directors have welcomed the recently announced moderation in government spending. Directors have also supported the prudent approach toward widening the fund’s investment portfolio.
International Monetary Fund
This Joint Staff Advisory Note focuses on the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) for Djibouti. Djibouti’s National Initiative for Social Development (“Initiative Nationale pour le Développement Social”—INDS) provides a comprehensive vision for economic growth and poverty reduction. Notwithstanding some important achievements of the PRSP-I, overall progress in achieving its objectives has been limited. IMF staff commends the government for a well-designed and ambitious poverty reduction strategy. IMF staff considers that the INDS benefits from better prioritization and draws lessons from the shortcomings in the implementation of the PRSP-I.
International Monetary Fund
This Joint Staff Advisory Note describes the progress made on the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) in Sierra Leone on the basis of the June 2008 progress report. The report analyzes key elements of the Poverty Reduction Strategy (PRS), including: macroeconomic performance; good governance, peace, and security; pro-poor sustainable growth for food security and job creation; human resource development; and monitoring and evaluation of the PRS. The progress report correctly indicates that implementation of poverty reduction programs suffered setbacks owing to weak revenue performance and delays in external budget support since late 2006.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses key findings of the 2006 Article IV Consultation and Third Review Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility for Niger. Macroeconomic performance and policy implementation have been broadly satisfactory. After a drought in 2004, a bumper harvest in late 2005 and good rains in 2006 have helped economic recovery, improved food security, and eased inflation. The fiscal deficit in 2006 is expected to be narrower than programmed, reflecting mainly lower spending on investment and food security.