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Adolf J.H. Enthoven

In an article in the last issue of Finance and Development Adolf J.H. Enthoven showed how accountancy has through its history continuously responded to new needs. In this article he indicates how he believes it should now respond to the requirements of the developing countries.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper discusses the employment of women in developing countries in the light of recent changes in emphasis on the strategy and objectives of economic development. The paper highlights that in the vast majority of countries—both developed and developing—the role of women is still limited and their responsibilities restricted. This paper examines automated manufacturing techniques in developing economies. The operations and transactions of the special drawing account are discussed. The paper also analyzes Latin America’s prospects for overcoming historical attitudes and other constraints to achieve wider economic integration.

C. J. Martin

Writers on development organization often advocate the setting up of programing units in various government departments, each making plans for a single sector of the economy. But many governments of developing countries do not have the manpower for such ambitious spreading of rare expertise. The author suggests that it would often be wiser to concentrate available skills in a Central Projects Bureau.

Sir William Ryrie

This paper anlayzes the role of the International Financial Corporation (IFC) in promoting economic development in developing countries with the private sector. IFC promotes growth of new companies, indigenous companies, and helps to introduce more capital from private sources into developing countries. Many countries need to develop capital market institutions such as stock exchanges, securities companies, leasing companies, and financial intermediaries of one kind or another. IFC has a special department, partly financed by the World Bank, that has provided expertise in these areas to a number of countries.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This paper examines the importance of national planning for economic development of a country. The paper highlights that when World War II began, Soviet Russia was the only country engaged in systematic development planning, and then only since 1929, when its First Five-Year Plan was approved. At the end of the War, Asian countries that either had, or were about to, become independent, embraced planning to a much greater extent than countries in any other region.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This paper discusses the study on development planning conducted by a small group within the World Bank. The study reveals that most countries not only encounter the same planning problems, they make the same mistakes. The paper highlights that although most countries with development plans have not succeeded in carrying them out, some countries without national development plans or national planning agencies have been developing rapidly. The paper also highlights that the lack of government support is the prime reason why so few development plans are carried out.
International Monetary Fund
In this study, the following are discussed: nominal GDP by economic activity and expenditure, quarterly nominal GDP by economic activity and expenditure, composition of nominal GDP by economic activity and expenditure, quarterly composition of nominal GDP by economic activity and expenditure, real GDP by economic activity and expenditure, quarterly real GDP by economic activity and expenditure, growth in real GDP by economic activity and expenditure, growth in quarterly real GDP by economic activity and expenditure, oil and gas production and sales, and government and private sector employment.
International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.