Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for :

  • Money and Monetary Policy x
  • Health, Education, and Welfare x
  • The Family; Marriage; Woman x
Clear All
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

1. The government’s growth and employment strategy recognizes the promotion of gender equality as key to achieving inclusive growth and meeting the SDGs. The 2035 Vision of Emerging Cameroon states that “Cameroon, an emerging country, builds on the principles of good governance where women and men can enjoy the same rights and participate equally and in an equitable manner to the development”. Implementation has followed, with a rapid reduction of Cameroon’s gender inequality index (GII)2 in recent years, to just above the Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) average. But remaining gender gaps prevent women from fully participating in the economy. Women suffer more from poverty and unemployment and tend to work in low paying activities. Women’s access to education and health access is lower than for men. Almost 40 percent of women are married before age 18, resulting in fertility and maternal mortality rates well above the SSA average.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

Costa Rica: Selected Issues and Analytical Notes

International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

This analysis presents the current status of gender gaps in The Gambia and their implications to the economy. It examines, from a gender perspective, the impacts of the high cost of living and the determinants of poverty. Subsequently, it investigates macroeconomic and distributional gains from closing gender gaps in the labor market. The analysis finds that, despite recent government efforts in advancing gender policies, the country still suffers from substantial gender gaps in the labor market, as well as discriminatory social and political norms. Women in rural areas are hindered the most by the high cost of living, driven by recent global shocks. Closing gender gaps in the labor market would significantly boost GDP, government revenues, women’s earnings, and reduce income inequality.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This Selected Issues Paper explores policy options to close gender gaps in Mexico. It analyzes policies to boost both female labor force participation and formal employment, looking at regional differences, showing how significant gains could be achieved, especially in rural areas. It also takes stock of fiscal policies with gender implications implemented so far and considers additional steps to address remaining gender inequalities. Finally, it analyzes legal impediments for women’s economic empowerment, focusing on labor market reforms. The analysis sheds light on the effects of such policies in rural and urban areas in Mexico. Findings indicate that childcare policies are indeed effective in increasing female labor force participation. However, childcare policies implemented in isolation could also lead to a rise in female labor informality, thereby hindering productivity growth. In order to fully realize the benefits of having more women in the labor force, the model recommends that childcare policies be complemented with other policies that foster the formal sector.
International Monetary Fund

This Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper for the Kingdom of Lesotho presents a determined plan in pursuance of high and sustainable equity-based economic growth. It contains medium-term objectives and strategies to address the major challenges facing the country. These challenges include employment creation and income generation, and improving quality of and access to education and health services. Lesotho plans to deal boldly with its trading and investment partners by exploiting the opportunities inherent in the process of globalization under such mechanisms as the Africa Growth and Opportunities Act.

International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

1. Gender inequalities in opportunities and outcomes persist in Lesotho and the growth potential from closing the gender gaps is sizable. Gender-based legal restrictions, as well as barriers in access to education, healthcare, financial services, assets, the labor market, and formalsector employment prevent women from fully and equally participating in the economy. This in turn lowers aggregate productivity and hampers the efficient allocation of talent and resources, thereby weighing down on economic growth. Eliminating gender inequality is thus macro-critical — it can boost productivity and help countries fulfill their growth potential, while enhancing economic stability and resilience.2 A 2015 study suggests that closing the gender gap of Lesotho with the ASEAN-5 countries could boost economic growth by 0.5 percentage point, which is comparable to cutting income inequality, and greater than the impact of improving infrastructure. To quantify, we selected a subgroup of ASEAN-5 countries with a strong track record of growth as the benchmark and decomposed the differences in average real GDP per capita growth between Lesotho and these fast-growing countries to determine the role that different factors play in explaining Lesotho’s growth shortfall (Figure 1).3

International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

This paper explores the state of gender equality and education attainment of girls in Niger. It also estimates the macroeconomic gains from reducing gaps in education between boys and girls using a micro-founded general equilibrium model. The analysis shows that Niger has made some progress toward higher educational attainment for girls, but the country still lags far behind other sub-Saharan African countries. The results from the general equilibrium model suggest that closing the gender gaps in education would boost female labor participation, increase income earned by women and improve fiscal outcomes. More importantly, closing the gender gap in years of schooling in each income percentile would boost long-term GDP by 11 percent. These significant economic gains from investing in girls’ education will contribute to the achievements of the strategic goals defined under the Programme de Développement Economique et Social (PDES) 2022-26.

International Monetary Fund. Strategy, Policy, & Review Department
On July 22, 2022, the Executive Board of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) approved the IMF’s first Strategy toward Mainstreaming Gender into the IMF’s core activities. Mainstreaming gender at the IMF starts with the recognition that reducing gender disparities goes hand-in-hand with higher economic growth, greater economic stability and resilience, and lower income inequality. At the same time, economic and financial policies can exacerbate or narrow gender disparities. Well-designed macroeconomic, structural, and financial policies can support efficient and inclusive outcomes and equitably benefit women, girls, and the society in general. The strategy lays out how the IMF can help its member countries address gender disparities in the context of carrying out its core functions—surveillance, lending, and capacity development. The strategy comprises four key pillars: first, gender-disaggregated data collection and development of modeling tools to enable staff to conduct policy analysis; second, a robust governance framework for an evenhanded approach across members based on the macro-criticality of gender; third, strengthening collaboration with external partners to benefit from knowledge sharing and peer learning, leverage complementarities, and maximize the impact on the ground; and fourth, the efficient use of resources allocated to gender by putting in place a central unit for realizing scale economies and supporting country teams.
Rasmané Ouedraogo and Diego B. P. Gomes
This paper explores the state of gender equality and education attainment of girls in Niger. It also estimates the macroeconomic gains from reducing gaps in education between boys and girls using a micro-founded general equilibrium model. The analysis shows that Niger has made some progress toward higher educational attainment for girls, but the country still lags far behind other sub-Saharan African countries. The results from the general equilibrium model suggest that closing the gender gaps in education would boost female labor participation, increase income earned by women and improve fiscal outcomes. More importantly, closing the gender gap in years of schooling in each income percentile would boost long-term GDP by 11 percent. These significant economic gains from investing in girls’ education will contribute to the achievements of the strategic goals defined under the Programme de Développement Economique et Social (PDES) 2022-26.
Mamadou D Barry, Momodou Jallow, Glen Kwende, and Vivian Malta
We present the current status of labor market gender gaps in The Gambia and examine the macroeconomic and distributional gains from closing the gaps. We also study the impacts of high costs of living and the determinants of poverty. Closing labor market gender gaps, would significantly boost GDP, government revenues, women’s earnings, and reduce income inequality. High food costs adversely affect the levels of consumption in the bottom four quartiles of the income distribution. Lack of access to finance, living in rural areas, lack of employment, low levels of education, and exposure to climate shocks contribute to higher poverty levels.