Browse

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for :

Clear All
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper reviews the “significant impact” of World Bank lending for the rural poor. The paper highlights that a review of 130 World Bank lending operations has found that 94 percent of the total investments completed between 1976 and 1979 have appeared to achieve their major objectives or are well on their way to doing so. And the World Bank’s first projects for helping large numbers of poor small farmers have significantly improved farmers’ productivity and incomes. Most of the projects were launched in the 1970s.

International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This 2014 Article IV Consultation highlights that economic rebound in Zimbabwe experienced since the end of hyperinflation in 2009 has now ended. After averaging 10 percent over 2009–2012, growth fell to an estimated 3.3 percent in 2013, reflecting tight liquidity conditions, election-year uncertainty, weak demand for key exports, competitiveness pressures, and the impact of adverse weather conditions. Inflation continued its downward trend from 2.9 percent (year over year) at end-2012 to ?0.3 percent in April 2014. The medium-term outlook, under the baseline scenario, is for growth to average some 4 percent, as large mining sector investments reach full capacity.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

For the latest thinking about the international financial system, monetary policy, economic development, poverty reduction, and other critical issues, subscribe to Finance & Development (F&D). This lively quarterly magazine brings you in-depth analyses of these and other subjects by the IMF’s own staff as well as by prominent international experts. Articles are written for lay readers who want to enrich their understanding of the workings of the global economy and the policies and activities of the IMF.

International Monetary Fund
This paper provides a semi-annual review of the status of financing for the Fund’s concessional lending and debt relief to low-income countries (LICs). Since the last review, the Executive Board has approved comprehensive reforms of the Fund’s concessional lending instruments and financing framework. This update is based on data available at end-August and also takes into account the implications of these reforms.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

This 2014 Article IV Consultation highlights that economic rebound in Zimbabwe experienced since the end of hyperinflation in 2009 has now ended. After averaging 10 percent over 2009–2012, growth fell to an estimated 3.3 percent in 2013, reflecting tight liquidity conditions, election-year uncertainty, weak demand for key exports, competitiveness pressures, and the impact of adverse weather conditions. Inflation continued its downward trend from 2.9 percent (year over year) at end-2012 to ?0.3 percent in April 2014. The medium-term outlook, under the baseline scenario, is for growth to average some 4 percent, as large mining sector investments reach full capacity.

International Monetary Fund

This Selected Issues paper and Statistical Appendix analyzes recent trends in poverty and social indicators for Zimbabwe. It discusses land reform, agricultural policies, and the outcomes. The paper presents background information on the evolution of inflation and money aggregates in Zimbabwe. It analyzes the demand of money since the late 1990s, and discusses factors that can lead to diverging paths of inflation and money growth in the short term. The paper also analyzes Zimbabwe’s export performance in recent years, and identifies the factors that could improve export performance, from both a quantitative and qualitative perspective.

International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

Context. The authorities met all their commitments under the Staff-Monitored Program (SMP), despite economic and financial difficulties. Inadequate external inflows, lower commodity prices, the dollar appreciation, and the El-Niño-induced drought hurt economic activity. The authorities have started to rationalize civil service by exploiting opportunities for cost savings, amended the Public Financial Management and Procurement Acts for Parliament and Cabinet approval, respectively, and rid the financial sector of problem banks and reduced non-performing loans. They garnered broad support for their reengagement strategy from creditors and development partners, in particular their plans to clear arrears to the International Financial Institutions.