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International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The Fabric of Reform examines the effects of economic reform in three African countries in the CFA franc zone (see box on p. 3)— Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, and Mali—all of which gained their independence from France in 1960. Interviews with entrepreneurs, government officials, economists, and citizens help give the viewer insight into the economic gains brought about by reform as well as the challenges these countries continue to face.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

1. Foreign investment is important to a country’s development. Ask students to research and report on an industry that was bolstered by foreign investment and the effect that this had on the country’s overall economic development in the decades immediately following the investment.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This guide is designed to facilitate classroom use of The Fabric of Reform, a 30-minute educational video created by the International Monetary Fund. It is intended for use with students in economics and international relations courses at the secondary and postsecondary levels.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

To build better lives for their people, policymakers in developing countries must implement reforms that ensure that economic growth keeps pace with increasing populations. These reforms often must be implemented simultaneously or in a carefully planned sequence, and thus they necessitate a very high level of cooperative decision-making.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This Study Guide is designed to facilitate classroom use of The Fabric of Reform, a 30-minute educational video created by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). The Guide is intended for use with students in economics and international relations courses at the secondary and post-secondary levels. It includes a segment-by-segment summary of the video; background information; pre-viewing, post-viewing, and research activities; a list of resources; a glossary; maps; and charts.

International Monetary Fund
The cotton sector in Mali is facing major challenges to overcome, with low export prices, technical hurdles, and a poorly performing state-owned cotton ginner. Some reforms, most notably with regard to the setting of the farmgate procurement price, have already been undertaken, but more is needed to put the sector on a sound financial footing. It is vital that the production process be modernized and the ginner profoundly reformed if cotton is to play a major role in poverty reduction in rural Mali.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This Selected Issues paper presents an external stability assessment on Niger. Niger’s current account balance deteriorated in 2013, mostly on account of higher food and capital goods imports. The deficit is expected to widen further in 2014–15, mainly driven by large investment in the extractive industry and basic infrastructure. The current account is projected to gradually improve from 2016 as important projects in infrastructure will come to end, the oil and mining sectors come on stream and public and private savings increase. Although aid and foreign direct investments are the main sources of external financing, external borrowing–mainly on concessional terms–has increased significantly.
Mr. Jeromin Zettelmeyer
After the break-up of the Soviet Union, Uzbekistan’s output fell less than in any other former Soviet Republic, and growth turned positive in 1996/97. Given the country’s hesitant and idiosyncratic approach to reforms, this record has suprised many observers. This paper first shows that a standard panel model of growth in transition systematically underpredicts Uzbek growth from 1992-1996, confirming the view that Uzbekistan’s performance consitutes a puzzle. It then attempts to resolve the puzzle by appropriately extending the model. The main result is that Uzbekistan’s output performance was driven by a combination of low initial industrialization, its cotton production, and its self-sufficiency in energy.