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Abstract

Established in 1994,1 the International Monetary Fund Administrative Tribunal (“IMFAT” or “Tribunal”) serves as an independent judicial forum for the resolution of employment disputes arising between the International Monetary Fund (“IMF” or “Fund”) and its staff members.2 An Applicant may challenge the legality of an “individual” or “regulatory” decision of the Fund by which he has been “adversely affect[ed].”3 In the case of challenges to “individual” decisions, an Application may be filed only after the Applicant has exhausted all available channels of administrative review.4 The Judgments of the Tribunal are final and without appeal.5

Virginia Alonso-Albarran, Ms. Teresa R Curristine, Gemma Preston, Alberto Soler, Nino Tchelishvili, and Sureni Weerathunga

Achieving gender equality remains a significant challenge, that has only deepened with the on-set of the COVID-19 pandemic. Gender budgeting (GB) can help promote gender equality by applying a gender perspective to fiscal policies and the budget process. This paper takes stock of GB practices in G20 countries and benchmarks country performance using a GB index and data gathered from an IMF survey. All G20 countries have enacted gender focused fiscal policies but the public financial management (PFM) tools to operationalize these policies are far less established. We find that notwithstanding heterogeneity across countries, the average G20 level of GB practice is relatively low. More progress has been made establishing GB frameworks and budget preparation tools than with budget execution, monitoring and auditing. Too few countries assess the upfront impact of policies on gender and/or evaluate ex-post the effectiveness of policies and programs. Where GB features are in place, they tend to operate as an ‘add-on’, rather than a strategic and integral part of resource allocation decisions. Progress with GB does not appear to be dependent on the level of country development. Key to future efforts will be harnessing opportunities for integrating GB tools into existing PFM systems and more closely linking GB initiatives with PFM reforms.

Romina Kazandjian, Ms. Lisa L Kolovich, Ms. Kalpana Kochhar, and Ms. Monique Newiak
We show that gender inequality decreases the variety of goods countries produce and export, in particular in low-income and developing countries. We argue that this happens through at least two channels: first, gender gaps in opportunity, such as lower educational enrollment rates for girls than for boys, harm diversification by constraining the potential pool of human capital available in an economy. Second, gender gaps in the labor market impede the development of new ideas by decreasing the efficiency of the labor force. Our empirical estimates support these hypotheses, providing evidence that gender-friendly policies could help countries diversify their economies.
International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Volume IV of IMF Administrative Tribunal Reports contains the Judgments and Orders of the IMF Administrative Tribunal rendered during the year 2005. An analysis of the Tribunal’s jurisprudence for the period is provided in an introductory chapter “Developments in the Jurisprudence of the IMF Administrative Tribunal: 2005.” A detailed topical Index of the Judgments and Orders is included near the end of the volume. Finally, the reader will find republished as an Appendix to this volume the Tribunal’s Statute, Rules of Procedure, and the Report of the International Monetary Fund’s Executive Board on the establishment of the Administrative Tribunal. The Tribunal initially addressed the Applicant’s principal claim, that the abolition of his position represented an abuse of managerial discretion. Referring to the governing provisions of the IMF’s internal law, the Tribunal noted that the essential requirements for a lawful abolition of position are that the position has been abolished or redesigned to meet institutional needs and the incumbent is no longer qualified to fulfill its requirements.

Mr. Stephen M. Schwebel, Mr. Nisuke Ando, Mr. Michel Gentot, Mr. Georges Abi-Saab, and Mr. Agustín Gordillo

Abstract

1. On March 17 and 18, 2005, the Administrative Tribunal of the International Monetary Fund, composed of Judge Stephen M. Schwebel, President, and Judges Nisuke Ando and Michel Gentot, Associate Judges, met to adjudge the case brought against the International Monetary Fund by Mr. “F”, a former staff member of the Fund.

Mr. Stephen M. Schwebel, Mr. Nisuke Ando, Mr. Michel Gentot, Mr. Georges Abi-Saab, and Mr. Agustín Gordillo

Abstract

1. On July 28 and 29, 2005, the Administrative Tribunal of the International Monetary Fund, composed of Judge Stephen M. Schwebel, President, and Judges Michel Gentot and Agustín Gordillo, Associate Judges, met to adjudge the case brought against the International Monetary Fund by Ms. “W”, a staff member of the Fund.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

1. On December 6 and 7, 2005, the Administrative Tribunal of the International Monetary Fund, composed of Judge Stephen M. Schwebel, President, and Judges Nisuke Ando and Michel Gentot, Associate Judges, met to adjudge the case brought against the International Monetary Fund by Ms. “Z”, a staff member of the Fund.