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International Monetary Fund

This paper discusses key findings of the Sixth Review Under the Extended Credit Facility (ECF) for The Gambia. Recent performance under the ECF-supported program continued to be broadly satisfactory. All quantitative performance criteria for end-September 2009 were achieved, except for the fiscal target, and there was good progress on the structural agenda. IMF staff recommends approval of the authorities’ request for a waiver for the nonobservance of the fiscal performance criterion based on corrective actions, notably the government budget for 2010 approved by the National Assembly with a near-zero basic balance.

International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

This 2015 Article IV Consultation highlights that The Gambia has experienced large balance of payments and fiscal imbalances, caused by persistent policy slippages in recent years and financial difficulties in public enterprises. The IMF supported the authorities' efforts through a Rapid Credit Facility (RCF) disbursement in early April 2015 and a Staff-Monitored Program (SMP). However, major policy slippages have occurred since the RCF disbursement, pushing the SMP off track and worsening the outlook considerably. In light of the elevated level of public debt, the government should prioritize infrastructure investments that help address poverty and improve the business environment. The authorities are encouraged to continue their efforts to improve supervision capacity to enhance financial stability.

Mr. Christian H. Beddies
This paper considers the potential variables that have determined economic growth in The Gambia during 1964–98. The results indicate that The Gambia’s aggregate production function exhibits increasing returns to scale, thus supporting the endogenous growth-type model. The impact of private investment—and thus private capital accumulation—on output is large and significant. Furthermore, increases in public investment boost output substantially. Finally, the effects associated with human capital accumulation are positive and statistically significant. The paper also estimates a series on total factor productivity growth that indicates that The Gambia was able to use its resources more efficiently.
STEPHEN MINK

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