Browse

You are looking at 1 - 9 of 9 items for :

  • Debt; Debt Management; Sovereign Debt x
  • Independent Evaluation Office Reports x
  • Central African Republic x
  • Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth x
  • International Economics x
Clear All
International Monetary Fund. Independent Evaluation Office

Abstract

This report sets out the main findings and recommendations of an independent evaluation of the IMF’s role and performance in the determination of the external resource envelope in low-income countries in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The evaluation concentrated on aid—the principal source of external financing for most such countries—and in particular on how the IMF has interfaced with country recipients and donors in shaping the provision and use of aid in the pursuit of poverty reduction and other development goals. It focused on programs supported by the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF)—the IMF’s primary instrument for operational work in SSA.

International Monetary Fund. Independent Evaluation Office

Abstract

This chapter reports on the evaluation’s findings about aid-related issues in the design of PRGF-supported programs. It covers (1) the links between aid and current account and fiscal adjustment in PRGFs; (2) PRGFs’ analysis of aid; and (3) the PRGF’s pro-poor and pro-growth agenda.1 The chapter’s focus is on program design—both for the initial PRGF program period and for subsequent program periods following reviews—as it is at the design stage that Fund staff’s inputs and contributions are most clearly seen.

International Monetary Fund. Independent Evaluation Office

Abstract

This chapter sets out relevant findings about Fund relationships with the authorities, donors, multi-lateral partners, and local civil society groups. It draws on face-to-face interviews and the evaluation survey.1 A key contextual issue is the changing operating environment for aid to SSA, with donors increasingly decentralizing resources and decision making to country offices with implications for how the IMF is perceived, given its more limited field presence (see Box 3.1). The evidence presented in the chapter suggests major differences of views between how IMF staff see themselves and how partners and stakeholders see them, especially in the aid arena. It thus raises questions about how the IMF acquires and processes feedback about its own performance—in view of the intrinsic value of such feedback for self-assessment, learning, and accountability and the information that such feedback may carry about changing conditions on the ground, as an input into strategy formulation and action planning.2

International Monetary Fund. Independent Evaluation Office

Abstract

This chapter looks at the institutional drivers of the trends discussed above. It focuses on Board-approved policies, management communications and guidance, and the implications for priorities for action by operational staff.

International Monetary Fund. Independent Evaluation Office

Abstract

Chapters 2–4 have set out many facts on Fund policies and practices in SSA, and on perceptions about Fund policies and practices. This chapter presents the evaluation team’s assessment of what those facts add up to and its recommendations for addressing the identified challenges going forward.

International Monetary Fund. Independent Evaluation Office

Abstract

This report sets out the main findings and recommendations of an independent evaluation of the IMF’s role and performance in the determination and use of aid to low-income countries in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The evaluation focused on 1999–2005. This was a time of improving macroeconomic performance in much of SSA, with increasing growth and falling inflation. It was a time when aid to SSA recovered from earlier declines, debt relief gained momentum, and donors began to move to multidonor budget support. It was a time when the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) was introduced—in late 1999—and the IMF transformed its Enhanced Structural Adjustment Facility (ESAF) into the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF).

International Monetary Fund. Independent Evaluation Office

Abstract

This independent evaluation of the IMF’s role and performance in the determination and use of aid to low-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa is presented at a ground-level view. Country performance has improved in many sub-Saharan Africa countries over the period, and the report details the role of the IMF’s programs, as well as perceptions of that role. The report is an important contribution to following through on the IMF’s commitment to its Poverty Reduction Strategy and makes three main recommendations for improving the coherence—actual and perceived—of the IMF’s policies and actions relating to aid to sub-Saharan Africa going forward.

International Monetary Fund. Independent Evaluation Office

Abstract

Alors que le débat sur le rôle joué par le FMI auprès des pays à faible revenu se poursuit, le Bureau indépendant d’évaluation (BIE) a entrepris d’examiner les modalités et l’efficacité de l’aide que l’institution apporte à l’Afrique subsaharienne. Ce rapport s'intéresse plus particulièrement aux politiques conduites et aux pratiques suivies par le FMI dans les opérations appuyées par la facilité pour la réduction de la pauvreté et pour la croissance (FRPC), principal canal du travail opérationnel de l’institution dans les pays à faible revenu entre 1999 et 2005. Le rapport formule également des recommandations pour accroître la cohérence — tant réelle que perçue — des politiques et activités de l’institution liées à l’aide à l’Afrique subsaharienne.

International Monetary Fund. Independent Evaluation Office

Abstract

This independent evaluation of the IMF’s role and performance in the determination and use of aid to low-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa is presented at a ground-level view. Country performance has improved in many sub-Saharan Africa countries over the period, and the report details the role of the IMF’s programs, as well as perceptions of that role. The report is an important contribution to following through on the IMF’s commitment to its Poverty Reduction Strategy and makes three main recommendations for improving the coherence—actual and perceived—of the IMF’s policies and actions relating to aid to sub-Saharan Africa going forward.