Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 16 items for :

  • Financial institutions x
Clear All
International Monetary Fund

Guyana has weathered the impact of the global crisis well by regional and global standards. The current account deficit declined by 5 percent of GDP (to 8.5 percent of GDP), largely led by a reduction in imports, particularly of fuel. Macroeconomic policies have remained prudent. Monetary policy tightened somewhat in 2009, supporting the decline in inflation and external stability. Structural reform has continued to focus on further reducing vulnerabilities and entrenching long-term growth. The authorities have consolidated insurance and bank supervision at the central bank.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

The economy has experienced seven consecutive years of robust growth, buoyed by high commodity prices, foreign direct investment and expansion of private sector credit. As part of a strategy to sustain growth, reduce poverty and curtail dependence on imported oil, the authorities are pursuing the Amaila Falls Hydro-electric Project (AFHP), entailing investment of about 30 percent of GDP. However, steps by Parliament that delayed important approvals led the private sector partner to withdraw, which could delay the project while additional financing is sought. Meanwhile, public debt remains high�around 60 percent of GDP�limiting the room to finance inclusive growth.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

While economic activity was supported by large new mining investments, growth slowed to 3 percent in 2015, reflecting delayed budget implementation and lower commodity prices. Inflation is expected to remain low. The decline in oil prices narrowed the current account deficit. The authorities plan to stimulate growth through increased public investment in 2016 and over the medium-term.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

2017 Article IV Consultation-Press Release; Staff Report; and Statement by the Executive Director for Guyana

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

2018 Article IV Consultation-Press Release and Staff Report

International Monetary Fund
This paper focuses on economic developments in Guyana during the 1990s. By 1991, economic performance had turned around in response to the shift in economic policies and the improved incentive framework. Following sizable reductions in 1989–90, real GDP grew by about 7 percent a year in 1991 and 1992, mainly owing to a recovery of export-related production and new foreign investments in the bauxite, gold, and forestry sectors. By 1992, inflation had declined markedly; the fiscal and external deficits were reduced substantially; and private and official capital inflows had risen significantly.
International Monetary Fund
The statistical data on value added by sector at current prices, value added by sector at constant prices, GDP by expenditure at current prices, consumer prices, population estimates, employment in the public sector, summary of the operations of the public sector and operations of the central government of Guyana are presented in this paper. The data on monetary survey, accounts of the bank of Guyana, value, price, and volume indices for exports and imports commodity, and related economic indices are also presented.
International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.
International Monetary Fund
In this study, the economic developments and policy responses of Trinidad and Tobago after the crisis is reviewed. Policy recommendations are used to strengthen the legal and regulatory framework. According to the IMF’s financial system stability assessment (FSSA), there were critical gaps in the overall legal, regulatory, and supervisory structure for the insurance sector. The quality of insurance sector supervision can be assessed against internationally accepted established “core principles.” In this paper, an overview is presented of why the crisis occurred and some suggestions on how to prevent a future crisis.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
The Web edition of the IMF Survey is updated several times a week, and contains a wealth of articles about topical policy and economic issues in the news. Access the latest IMF research, read interviews, and listen to podcasts given by top IMF economists on important issues in the global economy. www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/survey/so/home.aspx