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International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This Technical Note discusses the findings and recommendations made in the Financial Sector Assessment Program for Sweden in the areas of the systemic risk oversight framework and management. To promote accountability, the law should clarify the allocation of macroprudential powers between the government and the Finansinspektionen (Financial Supervisory Authority, FI) and grant the FI a clear legal mandate for macroprudential policy, with full operational independence. The Financial Stability Council, or a similar body—excluding the Ministry of Finance—should have the legal authority to issue recommendations, preferably with a “comply or explain” approach. The law should also ensure that the Sveriges Riksbank’s expertise in financial stability analysis finds a clear institutional role in the oversight of systemic risk.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This Technical Note discusses the findings and recommendations made in the Financial Sector Assessment Program for Finland in the area of macroprudential policy framework. The Finnish authorities regularly coordinate and collaborate with international bodies on macroprudential policy. Several macroprudential instruments were formally introduced in the legislation and activated recently. The 2014 Act on Credit Institutions implements macroprudential instruments, including those set out in the European Capital Requirement Directive. Despite the important progress made, there are some improvements that should be considered. The macroprudential policy toolkit should be expanded. The systemic risk buffer should be added to the toolkit, although its activation and level may still need further analysis.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
This 2016 Article IV Consultation highlights that the growth in Finland has turned tepidly positive again following a deep recession. GDP increased by 0.2 percent in 2015 driven by stronger private consumption and a rebound in investment. Although net export growth was weak, falling oil prices contributed to the nominal trade balance shifting into surplus, reducing the current account deficit. Better-than-expected fiscal performance brought the deficit back under the 3 percent Stability and Growth Pact limit in 2015. The recovery is likely to continue, but growth is set to remain slow at about 0.9 percent in 2016 and 1.1 percent in 2017. This outlook is subject to downside risks.