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International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This paper highlights Djibouti’s Requests for Disbursement Under the Rapid Credit Facility and Debt Relief Under the Catastrophe Containment and Relief Trust. The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic is having a severe impact on Djibouti, creating urgent balance of payments and fiscal financing needs. The authorities acted swiftly to contain and mitigate the spread and impact of the virus. Their prevention and containment measures and decisions to scale-up health and other emergency spending to protect households and firms hit by the crisis will help limit economic and social consequences. IMF support is expected to provide additional resources for the essential health and other emergency spending, including social safety nets. It will also help catalyze additional donor support. Once the crisis abates, temporary measures should be unwound, with policies refocusing on promoting a strong and inclusive recovery and preserving medium-term debt sustainability. It will be critical to address and prevent the recurrence of external arrears, ramp up operations of key projects, and reduce public sector borrowing.
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.

Requests for Disbursement Under the Rapid Credit Facility and Debt Relief Under the Catastrophe Containment and Relief Trust-Press Release; and Staff Report; and Statement by the Executive Director for Djibouti

International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.

2019 Article IV Consultation-Press Release; Staff Report; and Statement by the Executive Director for Djibouti

International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.

2019 Article IV Consultation-Press Release; Staff Report; and Statement by the Executive Director for Djibouti

International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This 2019 Article IV Consultation with Djibouti discusses that large-scale infrastructure investments and a rapid expansion of trade and logistics activities have fueled strong growth in recent years. The government has in recent years implemented large-scale investments to develop transport and logistics infrastructures. Combined with business climate reforms, this development strategy has fueled strong growth and positioned Djibouti well to become a regional trade and logistics hub. The IMF staff’s baseline projections assume a significant reduction in debt financed public investment. Growth is nonetheless projected to remain strong, driven by the rapid expansion in Ethiopia’s trade and a pickup in private investment. Fostering higher and inclusive growth and bolstering the external position require addressing impediments to private sector investment and improving external competitiveness. Critical reforms include further enhancing the business environment, promoting competition, and improving the governance and efficiency of public enterprises to lower factor costs, particularly in the telecommunications and electricity sectors.
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.

Djibouti is expanding its infrastructure to leverage its strategic location and foster growth, reduce poverty, and create jobs. The remarkable investments in ports and railways-started in 2015 and mostly debt-financed by financial institutions from China-presents opportunities as well as risks. With public debt rising from 50 to 85 percent of GDP in just two years, the authorities need to advance rapidly with critical reforms. Such reforms would aim at translating the investment boom into strong, inclusive, and job-creating growth to reduce poverty and return to a sustainable debt trajectory given the current high risk of debt distress. While there is strong ownership of such reforms under the authorities' Vision Djibouti 2035, close government coordination will be needed to ensure their effective implementation.

International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.

Djibouti is expanding its infrastructure to leverage its strategic location and foster growth, reduce poverty, and create jobs. The remarkable investments in ports and railways-started in 2015 and mostly debt-financed by financial institutions from China-presents opportunities as well as risks. With public debt rising from 50 to 85 percent of GDP in just two years, the authorities need to advance rapidly with critical reforms. Such reforms would aim at translating the investment boom into strong, inclusive, and job-creating growth to reduce poverty and return to a sustainable debt trajectory given the current high risk of debt distress. While there is strong ownership of such reforms under the authorities' Vision Djibouti 2035, close government coordination will be needed to ensure their effective implementation.

International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This 2016 Article IV Consultation highlights Djibouti’s expansion of its transportation and utilities infrastructure to leverage its strategic location as a shipping hub and host to military bases. The authorities’ development strategy, Vision Djibouti 2035, aims to transform the country into a middle-income economy and a logistics and commercial hub for all of eastern Africa. Growth is estimated to have reached 6.5 percent in 2016, driven by major public sector projects: the railroad to Ethiopia, the construction of several new ports, and a water pipeline from Ethiopia. Inflation rose to 3 percent on average in 2016, reflecting increased food and service prices.
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.

Djibouti: Selected Issues

International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.

Faced with scarcity of resources, Djibouti has pursued a strategy of developing infrastructure to exploit its strategic geographic location so as to foster rapid growth, reduce poverty and create much-needed jobs. Djibouti has had to resort to non-concessional financing, which has raised its external debt. Reform is crucial to generate the revenues needed to return to a sustainable external debt and fiscal path, achieve higher growth, and reduce widespread poverty and unemployment.