Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 20 items for :

  • Type: Journal Issue x
  • Central African Republic x
  • Financial Institutions and Services: General x
Clear All Modify Search
International Monetary Fund
This paper is the third in a series assessing macroeconomic developments and prospects in low-income developing countries (LIDCs). The first of these papers (IMF, 2014a) examined trends during 2000–2014, a period of sustained strong growth across most LIDCs. The second paper (IMF, 2015a) focused on the impact of the drop in global commodity prices since mid-2014 on LIDCs—a story with losers (countries dependent on commodity exports, notably fuel) and winners (countries with a more diverse export base, where growth remained robust). The overarching theme in this paper’s assessment of the macroeconomic conjuncture among LIDCs is that of incomplete adjustment to the new world of “lower for long” commodity prices, with many commodity exporters still far from a sustainable macroeconomic trajectory (Chapter 1). The analysis of risks and vulnerabilities focuses on financial sector stresses and medium-term fiscal risks, pointing to the actions, including capacity building, needed to manage and contain these challenges over time (Chapter 2). With 2016 the first year of the march towards the 2030 development goals, the paper also looks at how infrastructure investment can be accelerated in LIDCs, given that weaknesses in public infrastructure (such as energy, transportation systems) in LIDCs are widely seen as a key constraint on medium-term growth potential (Chapter 3). With the sharp adjustment in commodity prices now into its third year, some of the key messages of the paper are familiar: a) many commodity exporters, notably fuel producers, remain under significant economic stress, with sluggish growth, large fiscal imbalances, and weakened foreign reserve positions; b) countries with a more diversified export base are generally doing well, although several have been hit by declines in remittances, conflict/natural disasters, and the contractionary impact of macroeconomic stabilization programs; c) widening fiscal imbalances, in both commodity and diversified exporters, have resulted in rising debt levels, with severe financing stress emerging in some cases; and d) financial sector stresses have emerged in many LIDCs, with expectations that these strains will increase in many commodity exporters over the next 12–18 months. Key messages on financial sector oversight, on medium-term fiscal risks, and on tackling infrastructure gaps are flagged below. Read Executive Summary in: Arabic; Chinese; French; Spanish
International Monetary Fund
The HIPC Initiative and MDRI are nearly complete with 35 countries having already reached the completion point under the HIPC Initiative. One country, Chad, remains in the interim phase. Debt relief under the Initiatives has substantially alleviated debt burdens in recipient countries and has enabled them to increase their poverty-reducing expenditure by two and a half percentage points between 2001 and 2013. Creditor participation in the Initiative has been strong amongst the multilateral and Paris Club creditors; however participation from the other creditor groups still needs to be strengthened. The total cost of debt relief to creditors under the HIPC Initiative is currently estimated to be US$75.0 billion, while the costs to the four multilateral creditors providing relief under the MDRI is estimated to be US$41.1 billion in end-2013 present value terms.
Hovhannes Toroyan and Mr. George C Anayiotos
The paper assesses the effects of certain institutional factors on financial sector development in Sub- Saharan Africa (SSA). Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) is applied to determine the extent to which these institutions affect the financial sector, and to suggest which institutions play a more critical role in each country. Results suggest that institutional factors affect financial depth and access to financial services more than asset quality and profitability (measured by nonperforming loans (NPL) and return on equity (ROE). The results also suggest that depth of credit information has the strongest influence on the NPL ratio, and political stability affects access the most. Based on model findings, policy implications on prioritizing institutional reforms to enhance financial sector development are suggested for individual countries and for country groups.
Olatundun Janet Adelegan and Bozena Radzewicz-Bak
This study empirically analyzes the determinants of bond market development in a cross section of 23 sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries between 1990 and 2008. It considers the stage of development and the size of the bond market, as well as the historical, structural, institutional and macroeconomic factors driving bond market development in SSA. The study finds that the savings constraint is a key impediment to domestic bond markets development as well as financial market deepening, as it results in a low level of financial intermediation by the banks. Overall, the results show that a confluence of factors matters for the development of domestic bond markets in SSA; these include structure of the economy, investment profile, law and order, size of the banking sector, the level of economic development, and various macroeconomic factors. Policy implications include increased efforts to strengthen the investment environment and the need for a regional approach to bond market development.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses key findings of the financial system stability assessment (FSSA) on the Central African Republic. The assessment reveals that the liquidity position of the financial sector has improved in recent years. This reflects a more favorable economic environment following the end of hostilities, higher remittance receipts, increased donor financing, and a weak loan demand. The assessment also reveals that although systemic risks presently appear manageable, the banking system exhibits important weaknesses. Significant structural impediments weigh on the capacity of the financial sector to support development.
Mr. Dhaneshwar Ghura, Mr. Kangni R Kpodar, and Mr. Raju J Singh
During the 1980s and early 1990s many Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries undertook reforms to promote financial sector deepening. Nevertheless, financial sectors in SSA countries remain among the shallowest in the world and, within Sub-Saharan Africa, financial depth in the CFA franc zone is even more limited. This paper sets out to investigate empirically factors that may explain why financial depth in the CFA franc zone is shallower than in the rest of SSA using panel data for a sample of 40 countries for 1992-2006. The results indicate that the gap in financial development between the CFA franc zone countries and the rest of SSA can be explained by differences in institutional quality (e.g., availability of credit information, and strength and enforcement of property rights), variables that policy makers can influence.
International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The 2007 Annual Report to the Board of Governors reviews the IMF's activities and policies during the financial year (May 1, 2006, through April 30, 2007). This year's Report has been streamlined and translated into three more languages than in the past: Arabic, Japanese, and Russian. Besides an Overview, the chapters cover promoting financial and macroeconomic stability and growth through surveillance; program support; capacity building: technical assistance and training; and the IMF's governance, organization, and finances. The full financial statements for the year and other appendixes are provided on a CD-ROM. ISSN 0250-7498

International Monetary Fund
Over the past six months, work has concentrated on making surveillance more effective, reforming quotas and voice, and reviewing the finances of the institution to place them on a sustainable footing. Progress has also been made with other key elements of the medium-term strategy, including capacity building, crisis prevention, and support for emerging markets and low-income countries. In January, the Fund welcomed its 185th member, the Republic of Montenegro
International Monetary Fund

Abstract

El Informe Anual 2007 a la Junta de Gobernadores pasa revista a las actividades y políticas del FMI durante el ejercicio (1 de mayo de 2006 al 30 de abril de 2007). El Informe de este año se ha simplificado y se ha traducido a tres idiomas más que en años anteriores: árabe, japonés y ruso. Se presenta un panorama general, seguido de capítulos que abordan cómo promover la estabilidad financiera y macroeconómica por medio de la supervisión; el respaldo a los programas; el fortalecimiento de las capacidades: asistencia técnica y capacitación, y la estructura de gobierno del FMI, su organización y finanzas. Los estados financieros completos correspondientes a este ejercicio, junto con otros apéndices, se publican en CD-ROM.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The 2007 Annual Report to the Board of Governors reviews the IMF's activities and policies during the financial year (May 1, 2006, through April 30, 2007). This year's Report has been streamlined and translated into three more languages than in the past: Arabic, Japanese, and Russian. Besides an Overview, the chapters cover promoting financial and macroeconomic stability and growth through surveillance; program support; capacity building: technical assistance and training; and the IMF's governance, organization, and finances. The full financial statements for the year and other appendixes are provided on a CD-ROM. ISSN 0250-7498