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Mr. Magnus Saxegaard, Ms. Michaela Erbenova, and Ms. Yan Liu
This paper reviews Latvia’s efforts to manage the increase in debt distress resulting from the unwinding of the 2000-07 credit boom and spillovers from the global financial crisis. The authorities have designed a strategy that strengthens incentives for marked-based debt resolution by improving the legal framework for credit enforcement, introducing tax incentives for debt write-downs, and strengthening financial sector supervision. These measures have started to yield results, but further steps are needed to speed up bankruptcy procedures and reduce credit enforcement costs. Latvia’s experience with market-based debt resolution may provide insights on managing debt distress in other countries with limited fiscal resources.
International Monetary Fund
In December 2008, the IMF Executive Board discussed the Seventh Review of Data Standards Initiatives, and Directors requested staff to return to the Board within about a year with a proposal for the inclusion of selected financial indicators in the Special Data Dissemination Standard (SDDS). This paper responds to the 2008 request taking into account recent developments. The recent financial crisis has heightened the need for policymakers, financial regulators and capital market participants to put in place conditions that would help prevent the occurrence of similar crises in the future. One of the areas identified by the international community as key in crises prevention is the availability of timely and more detailed financial data that could provide early warning signals of impending risks and vulnerabilities
International Monetary Fund
This report examines the Heavily-Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Initiative paper on Afghanistan. Afghanistan has made sufficient progress in meeting the completion point triggers, despite a challenging environment during the HIPC interim period, marked by increasing insecurity in parts of the country and the global fuel and food crisis. It has fully implemented the triggers on preparing and implementing a poverty reduction strategy paper, maintaining a stable macroeconomic environment, improving debt management and public financial and expenditure management, and improving the business environment.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
'Crisis Shakes Europe: Stark Choices Ahead' looks at the harsh toll of the crisis on both Europe's advanced and emerging economies because of the global nature of the shocks that have hit both the financial sector and the real economy, and because of Europe's strong regional and global trade links. Marek Belka, Director of the IMF's European Department, writes in our lead article that beyond the immediate need for crisis management, Europe must revisit the frameworks on which the European Union is based because many have been revealed to be flawed or missing. But in many respects, one key European institution has proved its mettle—the euro. Both Charles Wyplosz and Barry Eichengreen discuss the future of the common currency. Also in this issue, IMF economists rank the current recession as the most severe in the postwar period; John Lipsky, the Fund's First Deputy Managing Director, examines the IMF's role in a postcrisis world; and Giovanni Dell'Ariccia assesses what we have learned about how to manage asset price booms to prevent the bust that has caused such havoc. In addition, we talk to Oxford economist Paul Collier about how to help low-income countries during the current crisis, while Donald Kaberuka, President of the African Development Bank, writes about how African policymakers can prepare to take advantage of a global economic recovery. 'Picture This' looks at what happens when aggressive monetary policy combats a crisis; 'Back to Basics' gives a primer on fiscal policy; and 'Data Spotlight' takes a look at the recent large swings in commodity prices.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
'Crisis Shakes Europe: Stark Choices Ahead' looks at the harsh toll of the crisis on both Europe's advanced and emerging economies because of the global nature of the shocks that have hit both the financial sector and the real economy, and because of Europe's strong regional and global trade links. Marek Belka, Director of the IMF's European Department, writes in our lead article that beyond the immediate need for crisis management, Europe must revisit the frameworks on which the European Union is based because many have been revealed to be flawed or missing. But in many respects, one key European institution has proved its mettle—the euro. Both Charles Wyplosz and Barry Eichengreen discuss the future of the common currency. Also in this issue, IMF economists rank the current recession as the most severe in the postwar period; John Lipsky, the Fund's First Deputy Managing Director, examines the IMF's role in a postcrisis world; and Giovanni Dell'Ariccia assesses what we have learned about how to manage asset price booms to prevent the bust that has caused such havoc. In addition, we talk to Oxford economist Paul Collier about how to help low-income countries during the current crisis, while Donald Kaberuka, President of the African Development Bank, writes about how African policymakers can prepare to take advantage of a global economic recovery. 'Picture This' looks at what happens when aggressive monetary policy combats a crisis; 'Back to Basics' gives a primer on fiscal policy; and 'Data Spotlight' takes a look at the recent large swings in commodity prices.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
'Crisis Shakes Europe: Stark Choices Ahead' looks at the harsh toll of the crisis on both Europe's advanced and emerging economies because of the global nature of the shocks that have hit both the financial sector and the real economy, and because of Europe's strong regional and global trade links. Marek Belka, Director of the IMF's European Department, writes in our lead article that beyond the immediate need for crisis management, Europe must revisit the frameworks on which the European Union is based because many have been revealed to be flawed or missing. But in many respects, one key European institution has proved its mettle—the euro. Both Charles Wyplosz and Barry Eichengreen discuss the future of the common currency. Also in this issue, IMF economists rank the current recession as the most severe in the postwar period; John Lipsky, the Fund's First Deputy Managing Director, examines the IMF's role in a postcrisis world; and Giovanni Dell'Ariccia assesses what we have learned about how to manage asset price booms to prevent the bust that has caused such havoc. In addition, we talk to Oxford economist Paul Collier about how to help low-income countries during the current crisis, while Donald Kaberuka, President of the African Development Bank, writes about how African policymakers can prepare to take advantage of a global economic recovery. 'Picture This' looks at what happens when aggressive monetary policy combats a crisis; 'Back to Basics' gives a primer on fiscal policy; and 'Data Spotlight' takes a look at the recent large swings in commodity prices.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Au sommaire de ce numéro, intitulé « La crise secoue l'Europe : des choix difficiles » : les pays avancés et émergents d'Europe payent un lourd tribut à la suite de la crise en raison de la nature mondiale des chocs qui ont touché tant le secteur financier que l'économie réelle, ainsi que de l'importance des relations commerciales de l'Europe à l'échelle régionale et internationale. Dans l'article principal, Marek Belka, directeur du département Europe du FMI, écrit que l'Europe, outre les impératifs immédiats de gestion de la crise, doit revoir les mécanismes sur lesquelles l'Union européenne s'appuie, parce que des lacunes et des défaillances sont apparues au grand jour. Mais par bien des aspects, un élément essentiel de l'intégration européenne a prouvé sa valeur : l'euro. Charles Wyplosz et Barry Eichengreen se penchent sur l'avenir de la monnaie unique. Toujours dans ce numéro, des économistes du FMI qualifient la récession actuelle de la plus profonde de l'après-guerre ; John Lipsky, Premier directeur général adjoint du FMI, examine le rôle de l'institution dans l'après-crise ; et Giovanni Dell'Ariccia aborde les enseignements à tirer pour gérer les boums des prix d'actifs de façon à éviter l'effondrement à l'origine de ces bouleversements. Nous nous entretenons également avec Paul Collier, économiste d'Oxford, à propos de l'aide apportée aux pays à faible revenu pendant la crise actuelle, tandis qu'un article de Donald Kaberuka, président de la Banque africaine de développement, aborde les mesures que les dirigeants africains peuvent prendre pour tirer parti de la reprise de l'économie mondiale qui s'annonce. Dans les autres rubriques, « Pleins feux » est consacré aux politiques monétaires énergiques pour combattre la crise, « L’ABC de l’économie » rappelle en quoi consiste la politique budgétaire, et « Gros plan » porte sur les grandes variations des produits de base constatées récemment.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
“La crisis sacude a Europa: Decisiones difíciles” examina los graves efectos de la crisis en las economías avanzadas y los mercados emergentes de Europa debido al carácter internacional de los shocks que han azotado tanto al sector financiero como a la economía real, y a las fuertes vinculaciones comerciales mundiales y regionales de Europa. Marek Belka, Director del Departamento de Europa del FMI, señala en el artículo principal de esta edición que más allá de la necesidad inmediata de gestionar la crisis, Europa debe replantearse los marcos en que se basa la Unión Europea porque muchos han resultado ser deficientes, o no existen. No obstante en muchos aspectos, una institución europea clave que ha demostrado claramente su valor es el euro. Charles Wyplosz y Barry Eichengreen analizan el futuro de la moneda común. También en este número, economistas del FMI describen la recesión actual como la más grave del período de la posguerra; John Lipsky, Primer Subdirector Gerente del FMI, examina el papel del FMI en el mundo de la poscrisis, y Giovanni Dell’Ariccia analiza las enseñanzas que pueden desprenderse de la gestión de los auges de precios de los activos para prevenir la caída que ha causado tantos daños. Además, conversamos con el economista de la Universidad de Oxford, Paul Collier, sobre la asistencia a los países de bajo ingreso en la actual crisis, mientras que Donald Kaberuka, Presidente del Banco Africano de Desarrollo, analiza cómo pueden prepararse los gobiernos africanos para aprovechar la recuperación económica mundial. En “Bajo la lupa” se pasa revista a lo que ocurre cuando se utiliza una política monetaria enérgica para combatir una crisis; en “Vuelta a lo esencial” se explica qué es la política fiscal, y en “Un vistazo a las cifras” se examinan los recientes altibajos de los precios de las materias primas.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
'Crisis Shakes Europe: Stark Choices Ahead' looks at the harsh toll of the crisis on both Europe's advanced and emerging economies because of the global nature of the shocks that have hit both the financial sector and the real economy, and because of Europe's strong regional and global trade links. Marek Belka, Director of the IMF's European Department, writes in our lead article that beyond the immediate need for crisis management, Europe must revisit the frameworks on which the European Union is based because many have been revealed to be flawed or missing. But in many respects, one key European institution has proved its mettle—the euro. Both Charles Wyplosz and Barry Eichengreen discuss the future of the common currency. Also in this issue, IMF economists rank the current recession as the most severe in the postwar period; John Lipsky, the Fund's First Deputy Managing Director, examines the IMF's role in a postcrisis world; and Giovanni Dell'Ariccia assesses what we have learned about how to manage asset price booms to prevent the bust that has caused such havoc. In addition, we talk to Oxford economist Paul Collier about how to help low-income countries during the current crisis, while Donald Kaberuka, President of the African Development Bank, writes about how African policymakers can prepare to take advantage of a global economic recovery. 'Picture This' looks at what happens when aggressive monetary policy combats a crisis; 'Back to Basics' gives a primer on fiscal policy; and 'Data Spotlight' takes a look at the recent large swings in commodity prices.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.

Abstract

Europe is in a deep recession. Adverse feedback between the financial and real sectors and across borders is likely to delay the recovery and create downside risks. Unprecedented policies have been undertaken to address the crisis-but are they likely to be successful and sufficiently coordinated for a tightly integrated region? To restore trust and confidence in financial markets, additional and forceful action will be essential. Maintaining fiscal support should help soften the downturn, in particular if sustainability is supported by solid medium-term strategies and fiscal frameworks. To be effective, these policies require coordination across advanced and emerging economies. The report's analytical work underpins the link between fiscal sustainability, coordination, and effectiveness, and stresses that emerging markets have been affected differently by the crisis, with the quality of policies and external vulnerabilities being key factors.