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International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The following remarks by the Acting Chair were made at the conclusion of the Executive Board's discussion of the Global Financial Stability Report on March 14, 2003.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The following remarks by the Acting Chair were made at the conclusion of the Executive Board’s discussion of the Global Financial Stability Report on March 30, 2009.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

Prepared by staff from the Monetary and Capital Markets Department (in consultation with other departments): The authors of this chapter are Anna Ilyina (Division Chief), Evan Papageorgiou (Deputy Division Chief), Sergei Antoshin, Yingyuan Chen, Fabio Cortes, Rohit Goel, Phakawa Jeasakul, Sanjay Hazarika, Kelly Eckhold, Frank Hespeler, Henry Hoyle, Piyusha Khot, Sheheryar Malik, Thomas Piontek, Akihiko Yokoyama, and Xingmi Zheng, under the guidance of Fabio Natalucci (Deputy Director). Magally Bernal and Andre Vasquez were responsible for word processing and the production of this report.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

Prepared by staff from the Monetary and Capital Markets Department (in consultation with other departments): The authors of this chapter are Nassira Abbas (Deputy Division Chief ), Antonio Garcia Pascual (Deputy Division Chief ), Evan Papageorgiou (Deputy Division Chief ), Jose Abad, Sergei Antoshin, John Caparusso, Liumin Chen, Yingyuan Chen, Fabio Cortes, Reinout De Bock, Dimitris Drakopoulos, Deepali Gautam, Rohit Goel, Sanjay Hazarika, Frank Hespeler, Henry Hoyle, Mohamed Jaber, Phakawa Jeasakul, Shuyi Liu, Sheheryar Malik, Sonia Meskin, Natalia Pavlovna Novikova, Dmitri Petrov, Thomas Piontek, Patrick Schneider, Can Sever, Juan Sole, Jeffrey Williams, Dmitry Yakovlev, Akihiko Yokoyama, and Xingmi Zheng, under the guidance of Fabio Natalucci (Deputy Director). Magally Bernal and Andre Vasquez were responsible for word processing and production of this report.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

For the first time since the October 2008 Global Financial Stability Report, risks to global financial stability have increased (Figures 1.2 and 1.3), signaling a partial reversal in progress made over the past three years. The pace of the economic recovery has slowed, stalling progress in balance sheet repair in many advanced economies. Sovereign stress in the euro area has spilled over to banking systems, pushing up credit and market risks. Low interest rates could lead to excesses as the “search for yield” exacerbates the turn in the credit cycle, especially in emerging markets. Recent market turmoil suggests that investors are losing patience with the lack of momentum on financial repair and reform (Box 1.1). Policymakers need to accelerate actions to address longstanding financial weaknesses to ensure stability.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The health of the global financial system has improved since the October 2009 Global Financial Stability Report (GFSR), as illustrated in our global financial stability map (Figure 1.1).1 However, risks remain elevated due to the still-fragile nature of the recovery and the ongoing repair of balance sheets. Concerns about sovereign risks could also undermine stability gains and take the credit crisis into a new phase, as nations begin to reach the limits of public sector support for the financial system and the real economy.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

Systemic risks remain high and the adverse feedback loop between the financial system and the real economy has yet to be arrested, despite the wide range of policy actions and some limited improvement in market functioning. Further effective government action—particularly geared toward cleansing balance sheets and strengthening institutions—will be required to stabilize the global financial system and to provide the foundation for a sustainable economic recovery. The banking system needs additional equity to absorb further writedowns as credit deteriorates, and risks are broadening to encompass nonbank institutions. The crisis has spread to emerging markets with the collapse of international financing, posing challenges to corporates, households, and banks as well as raising sovereign risk. The global policy response, including the IMF’s enhanced lending framework, should help to mitigate crisis risks. There remains considerable scope for further public commitments in larger economies, but extensive provision of financing and the transfer of balance sheet risk from the private to the public sector have increased tail risks for certain mature market sovereigns.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

Prepared by staff from the Monetary and Capital Markets Department (in consultation with other departments): The authors of this chapter are Dimitris Drakopoulos, Rohit Goel, Evan Papageorgiou (team leader), Dmitri Petrov, Patrick Schneider, Can Sever, and Jef Williams, under the guidance of Fabio Natalucci and Anna Ilyina. Magally Bernal and Andre Vasquez were responsible for word processing and the production of this report.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The rise in the complexity and globalization of financial services has contributed to stronger interconnections or linkages. While more extensive linkages contribute to economic growth by smoothing credit allocation and allowing greater risk diversification, they also increase the potential for disruptions to spread swiftly across markets and borders. In addition, financial complexity has enabled risk transfers that were not fully recognized by financial regulators or by institutions themselves, complicating the assessment of counterparty risk, risk management, and policy responses. Thus the importance of assessing the systemic implications of financial linkages.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The asset allocation decisions of investors are at the core of financial flows between markets, currencies, and countries. This chapter aims to identify the fundamental drivers for these decisions and determine whether their influence has been altered by the global financial crisis and the subsequent low interest rate environment in advanced economies. In particular, the chapter investigates whether changes in investor behavior pose downside risks for global financial stability.