Appendix IV: Stress-Testing of “In-the-Money” Options Under the Five Scenarios Shown in the Data Template1

Abstract

All options should, if necessary, first be converted into puts and calls in foreign currency. For this conversion, the strike price is used. For example, the central bank has written a call option whereby the purchaser of the option has the right to buy LC100 million at a strike price of LC90 = $1.00.2 As it is written, this is a local currency call option. In converting it into a foreign currency option, the right to buy LC100 million at a price of LC90 = $1.00 is equivalent to the right to sell $1.11 million (100 million/90) at the same strike price of LC 90 = $1.00. In terms of the template, this will be treated as a put option that the central authorities have written with a notional value of $1.11 million. Similarly, if the central bank has purchased a put option with a notional value of LC200 million and a strike price of LC110 = $1.00, this will be treated as a purchased call option with a notional value of $1.818 million (200 million/110).