Financial Soundness Indicators : Compilation Guide

Back Matter

Back Matter

Author(s):
International Monetary Fund
Published Date:
April 2006
    Share
    • ShareShare
    Show Summary Details
    Bibliography

      Abiad, Abdul, 2003, “Early Warning Systems: A Survey and a Regime-Switching Approach,IMF Working Paper 03/32 (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Accounting and Auditing Organization for Islamic Financial Institutions (AAOIFI), 1999, “Statement on the Purpose and Calculation of Capital Adequacy Ratio for Islamic Banks” (Bahrain).

      Asser, Tobias M. C.,2001, Legal Aspects of Regulatory Treatment of Banks in Distress (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2001, “Measuring Australia’s Foreign Currency Exposure,” 2001, in Balance of Payments and International Investment Position (Australian Bureau of Statistics) (December), pp. 1116.

      Bank for International Settlements, 1999, “Market Liquidity: Research Findings and Selected Policy Implications,”Committee on the Global Financial System Publication No. 11 (Basel).

      Bank for International Settlements, 2000, “Stress Testing by Large Financial Institutions: Current Practice and Aggregations Issues,”Committee on the Global Financial System Publication No. 14 (Basel).

      Bank for International Settlements, 2001a, Core Principles for Systemically Important Payment Systems,Committee on Payment and Settlement Systems Publication No. 43 (Basel).

      Bank for International Settlements, 2001b, Statistics on Payment Systems in the Group of Ten Countries,Committee on Payment and Settlement Systems Publication No. 44 (Basel).

      Bank for International Settlements, 2002, Triennial Central Bank Survey: Foreign Exchange and Derivative Market Activity in 2001 (Basel).

      Bank for International Settlements, 2003a, A Glossary of Terms Used in Payment and Settlement Systems,Committee on Payment and Settlement Systems (Basel).

      Bank for International Settlements, 2003b, “Guide to International Banking Statistics,”BIS Paper No. 16 (Basel).

      Bank for International Settlements, 2003c, Payment and Settlement Systems in Selected Countries,Committee on Payment and Settlement Systems Publication No. 53 (Basel) (known informally as the Red Book,fifth edition).

      Bank for International Settlements, and International Monetary Fund, 2005, “Real Estate Indicators and Financial Stability: Proceedings of a Joint Conference Organized by the BIS and the IMF in Washington on October 27–28, 2003,” BIS Paper No. 21 (Basel).

      Barton, Dominic, RobertoNewell, and GregoryWilson, 2002, Dangerous Markets: Managing in Financial Crises (New York: Wiley).

      Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS), 1983, “Principles for the Supervision of Banks’ Foreign Establishments” (Basel: Bank for International Settlements).

      Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS), 1988, “International Convergence of Capital Measurement and Capital Standards,”Basel Committee Publication No. 4 (Basel: Bank for International Settlements).

      Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS), 1991, “Measuring and Controlling Large Credit Exposures” (Basel: Bank for International Settlements).

      Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS), 1996, “Amendment to the Capital Accord to Incorporate Market Risks” (Basel: Bank for International Settlements).

      Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS), 1997, “Core Principles for Effective Banking Supervision” (Basel: Bank for International Settlements).

      Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS), 1999, “Sound Practices for Loan Accounting and Disclosure” (Basel: Bank for International Settlements).

      Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS), 2000a, “Principles for the Management of Credit Risk” (Basel: Bank for International Settlements).

      Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS), 2000b, “Sound Practices for Managing Liquidity in Banking Organisations” (Basel: Bank for International Settlements).

      Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS), 2001a, “Compendium of Documents, Volume One: Basic Supervisory Methods” (Basel: Bank for International Settlements).

      Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS), 2001b, “Consultative Document: The New Basel Capital Accord” (Basel: Bank for International Settlements).

      Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS), 2001c, “Consultative Document: Overview of the New Basel Capital Accord” (Basel: Bank for International Settlements).

      Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS), 2003a, “Consultative Document: Overview of the New Basel Capital Accord” (Basel: Bank for International Settlements).

      Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS), 2003b, “New Basel Capital Accord: Third Consultative Paper” (Basel: Bank for International Settlements).

      Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS), 2003c, “Principles for the Management and Supervision of Interest Rate Risk,”Basel Committee Publication No. 102 (Basel: Bank for International Settlements).

      Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS), 2004, Basel II: International Convergence of Capital Measurement and Capital Standards: A Revised Framework (Basel: Bank for International Settlements).

      Benito, Andrew, and GertjanVlieghe, 2000, “Stylised Facts on U.K. Corporate Financial Health: Evidence from Micro-data,”Financial Stability Review (Bank of England), Issue 8 (June), pp. 8393.

      Bhattacharya, Kaushik,2003, “How Good Is the BankScope Database? A Cross-Validation Exercise with Correction Factors for Market Concentration Measures,BIS Working Paper No. 133 (Basel: Bank for International Settlements).

      Blaschke, Winfrid J., Matthew T.Jones, GiovanniMajnoni, and Soledad MartinezPeria,2001, “Stress Testing of Financial Systems: An Overview of Issues, Methodologies, and FSAP Experiences,IMF Working Paper 01/88 (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Bliss, Robert R., and NikolaosPanigirtzoglou, 2002, “Testing the Stability of Implied Probability Density Functions,Journal of Banking & Finance, Vol. 26 (March), pp. 381422.

      Bloem, Adriaan M., Robert J.Dippelsman, and Nils Ø.Mæhle, 2001, Quarterly National Accounts Manual: Concepts, Data Sources, and Compilation (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Borio, Claudio,2003, “Towards a Macroprudential Framework for Financial Supervision and Regulation,BIS Working Paper No. 128 (Basel: Bank for International Settlements).

      Carson, Carol S.,2001, “Toward a Framework for Assessing Data Quality,IMF Working Paper 01/25 (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Case, Bradford, and Edward J.Szymanoski, 1995, “Precision in House Price Indices: Findings of a Comparative Study of House Price Index Methods,Journal of Housing Research, Vol. 6, Issue 3, pp. 48396.

      Commission of the European Communities, 2000, Commission Recommendations,C(2000) 1372 final-EN (Brussels).

      Commission of the European Communities, International Monetary Fund, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, United Nations, and the World Bank, 1993, System of National Accounts 1993 (Brussels/Luxembourg, New York, Paris, Washington).

      Cortavarria, Luis, ClaudiaDziobek, AkihiroKanaya, and InwonSong, 2000, “Loan Review, Provisioning, and Macroeconomic Linkages,IMF Working Paper 00/ 195 (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Crockett, Andrew,2000, “Marrying the Micro- and Macro-Prudential Dimensions of Financial Stability,” paper presented at the Eleventh International Conference of Banking Supervisors,Basel,September.

      Crockett, Andrew,2002, “Introductory Speech,” at the Third Joint Central Bank Research Conference on Risk Measurement and Systemic Risk,Basel,March.

      Danmarks Nationalbank, 2003, Financial Stability 2003 (Copenhagen).

      deLis, SantiagoFernández, Jorge MartínezPagés, and JesúsSaurina, 2000, “Credit Growth, Problem Loans, and Credit Risk Provisioning in Spain,Bank of Spain Working Paper 18 (Madrid: Bank of Spain).

      Delgado, Fernando L., Daniel S.Kanda, Greta MitchellCasselle, and R. ArmandoMorales, 2002, “Domestic Lending in Foreign Currency,” in Building Strong Banks: Surveillance and Resolution,ed. byCharlesEnoch, DavidMarston, and MichaelTaylor (ed) (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Derivatives Policy Group, 1995, “Framework for Voluntary Oversight of the OTC Derivatives Activities of Securities Firm Affiliates to Promote Confidence and Stability in Financial Markets” (New York).

      Dziobek, Claudia, J. KimHobbs, and DavidMarston, 2000, “Toward a Framework for Systemic Liquidity Policy,IMF Working Paper 00/34 (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Elsinger, Helmut, AlfredLehar, and MartinSummer, 2002, “Risk Assessment for Banking Systems,Austrian Central Bank Working Paper No. 79 (Vienna: Austrian National Bank).

      European Central Bank, 2000, EU Banks’ Income Statements (Frankfurt).

      European Central Bank, 2003, Seasonal Adjustment (Frankfurt).

      Eurostat, 1996, European System of Accounts: ESA 1995 (Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities).

      Frécaut, Olivier,2002, “Banking System Losses in Indonesia: Looking out for Fifty Billion U.S. Dollars—Can the SNA Help?,” presented at the Twenty Seventh General Conference of the International Association for Research in Income and Wealth,Stockholm,August.

      Furfine, Craig H. and Eli M.Remolona, 2002, “What’s Behind the Liquidity Spread? On-the-Run and Off-the-Run U.S. Treasuries in Autumn 1998,”BIS Quarterly Review (June), pp. 5158.

      Garcia, Gillian G. H.2000, “Deposit Insurance and Crisis Management,IMF Working Paper 00/57 (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Griliches, Zvi,1964, “Notes on the Measurement of Price and Quality Changes” in Models of Income Determination: NBER Studies in Income and Wealth, Vol. 28 (Princeton: Princeton University Press).

      Gropp, Reint, JukkaVesala, and GiuseppeVulpes, 2002, “Equity and Bond Market Signals as Leading Indicators of Bank Fragility,ECB Working Paper No. 150 (Frankfurt: European Central Bank).

      Heath, Robert M.,1998, “The Statistical Measurement of Financial Derivatives,IMF Working Paper 98/24 (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Hoggarth, Glenn, and JohnWhitley, 2003, “Assessing the Strength of UK Banks through Macroeconomic Stress Tests,”Financial Stability Review (Bank of England), Issue 14 (June), pp. 91103.

      International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), 2002, International Accounting Standards 2002 (London).

      International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), 2004, 2004 International Financial Reporting Standards (Bound Volume) (London).

      International Monetary Fund, 1993, Balance of Payments Manual (Washington,5th ed.).

      International Monetary Fund, 2000a, Monetary and Financial Statistics Manual (Washington).

      International Monetary Fund, 2000b, The New International Standards for the Statistical Measurement of Financial Derivatives: Changes to the Text of the 1993 SNA (Washington: Statistics Department).

      International Monetary Fund, 2001a, Government Finance Statistics Manual (Washington).

      International Monetary Fund, 2001b, The New International Standards for the Statistical Measurement of Financial Derivatives: Changes to the Text of the 1993 SNA (Washington).

      International Monetary Fund, 2002, Luxembourg: Financial System Stability Assessment, Including Reports on the Observance of Standards and Codes on the Following Topics: Monetary and Financial Stability Transparency, Banking Supervision, Securities Regulation, Insurance Regulation, and Payment Systems,IMF Country Report No. 02/116 (Washington).

      International Monetary Fund, 2003a, “Data Quality Assessment Framework for Monetary Statistics” (Washington). Available via the Internet: http://dsbb.imf.org/vgn/images/pdfs/dqrs_MonetaryAcc.pdf

      International Monetary Fund, 2003b, External Debt Statistics: Guide for Compilers and Users (Washington).

      International Monetary Fund, 2003c, “Fifth Review of the Fund’s Data Standards Initiative: Data Quality Assessment Framework and Data Quality Program” (Washington). Available via the Internet: http://www.imf.org/external/np/sta/dsbb/2003/eng/dqaf.htm#II

      International Monetary Fund, 2003d, “Financial Soundness Indicators” (Washington). Available via the Internet: http://www.imf.org/external/np/sta/fsi/eng/2003/051403.htm

      International Monetary Fund, 2003e, “Financial Soundness Indicators—Background Paper” (Washington). Available via the Internet: http://www.imf.org/external/np/sta/fsi/eng/2003/051403b.htm

      International Monetary Fund, and World Bank, 2002, “Implementation of the Basel Core Principles for Effective Banking Supervision, Experiences, Influences, and Perspectives” (Washington). Available via the Internet: http://www.imf.org/external/np/mae/bcore/2002/092302.pdf

      International Monetary Fund, 2003, Analytical Tools of the FSAP (Washington). Available via the Internet: http://www.imf.org/external/np/fsap/2003/022403a.pdf

      Jones, Matthew T., PaulHilbers, and GrahamSlack, 2004, “Stress Testing of Financial Systems: What to Do When the Governor Calls,IMF Working Paper 04/ 127 (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Jorion, Philippe,1997, Value at Risk: The New Benchmark for Controlling Derivatives Risk (Chicago: Irwin Professional Publications).

      Khawaja, Sarmad, and Thomas K.Morrison, 2002, “Statistical Legislation: Toward a More General Framework,IMF Working Paper 02/179 (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Latter, Tony,2001, “Derivatives from a Central Bank Perspective,” presented at the seminar program of the FOW Derivatives Expo,Hong Kong,November.

      Laurin, Alain, and GiovanniMajnoni, 2003, “Bank Loan Classification and Provisioning Practices in Selected Developed and Emerging Countries,World Bank Working Paper No. 1 (Washington: World Bank).

      Mori, Atutoshi, MakotoOhsawa, and TokikoShimizu, 1996, “A Framework for More Effective Stress Testing,Discussion Paper 96-E-2 (Tokyo: Bank of Japan, Institute for Monetary Economic Studies).

      Nelson, William, and WaynePassmore, 2001, “Pragmatic Monitoring of Financial Stability,” in Marrying the Macro- and Micro-Prudential Dimensions of Financial Stability, BIS Paper No. 1 (Basel: Bank for International Settlements), pp. 36784.

      Pollakowski, Henry O.,1995, “Data Sources for Measuring House Price Changes,Journal of Housing Research, Vol. 6, Issue 3, pp. 37787.

      Reinhart, Vincent, and BrianSack, 2002, “The Changing Information Content of Market Interest Rates,”BIS Quarterly Review (June), pp. 4050.

      Sarr, Abdourahmane, and TonnyLybek, 2002, “Measuring Liquidity in Financial Markets,IMF Working Paper 02/232 (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Saunders, Anthony,1999, Financial Institutions Management: A Modern Perspective (Boston: Irwin/McGraw-Hill,3rd ed.).

      Schachter, Barry,1998, “The Value of Stress Testing in Market Risk Management” in Derivatives Risk Management Service,ed. byG. TimothyHaight (ed) (Boston: Warren Gorham & Lamont).

      Slack, Graham L.,2003, “Availability of Financial Soundness Indicators,IMF Working Paper 03/58 (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Song, Inwon,2002, “Collateral in Loan Classification and Provisioning,IMF Working Paper 02/122 (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Sundararajan, Vasudevan, CharlesEnoch, Armida SanJosé, PaulHilbers, RussellKrueger, MarinaMoretti, and GrahamSlack, 2002, Financial Soundness Indicators: Analytical Aspects and Country Practices,IMF Occasional Paper No. 212 (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Sundararajan, Vasudevan, and LucaErrico, 2002, “Islamic Financial Institutions and Products in the Global Financial System: Key Issues in Risk Management and Challenges Ahead,IMF Working Paper 02/192 (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Taylor, John B.,1993, “Discretion Versus Policy Rules in Practice,Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Vol. 39 (December), pp. 195214.

      United Nations, European Commission, International Monetary Fund, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, and the World Trade Organization, 2001, Manual on Statistics of International Trade in Services (Geneva: United Nations).

      United States Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, 2004, Commercial Bank Examination Manual (Washington: Division of Banking Supervision and Regulation). Available via the Internet: http://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/housedebt/about.htm

      Vittas, Dimitri,1991, “Measuring Commercial Bank Efficiency: Use and Misuse of Bank Operating Ratios,Policy Research Working Paper No. 806 (Washington: World Bank).

    Index

    Numbers in references refer to paragraphs in chapters, boxes, or appendixes.

    • AAOIFI. See Accounting and Auditing Organization for Islamic Financial Institutions

    • Accounting and Auditing Organization for Islamic Financial Institutions, Box 4.3

    • Accounting framework, Box 4.1. See also Financial statements

    • Accrual accounting

      • time of recognition of flows and positions, 3.3–3.4

    • Agents

    • Aggregate resident-based approach, 5.13–5.14

    • Aggregation

      • combined with consolidation, 5.5

      • data requirements, 11.35–11.45

      • defined, 5.3

      • overview, 5.1

    • Arrears, 3.10–3.11, App. IV

    • Asset-based financial soundness indicators, 6.45–6.68

    • Asset quality, 14.6–14.11

    • Assets. See Financial assets and liabilities

    • Associates, 5.8–5.9

    • Average-period interest rates, 8.12

    • Average real estate prices, 9.16–9.17

    • Bad debt recoveries, App. IV

    • Balance of Payments Manual, fifth edition, Box 4.1

    • Balance-sheet-related series, 4.93–4.95, 11.25–11.34

    • Balance sheets

      • compiling consolidated data, 5.51–5.92

      • for deposit takers, 4.37–4.65

      • for households, 4.121

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.106–4.114, App. V

      • for other financial corporations, 4.96–4.98

      • overview, 4.9–4.12

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

    • Bank for International Settlements, 1.19, 8.52, 13.35

    • “Bank Loan Classification and Provisioning Practices in Selected Developed and Emerging Countries,” App. V

    • Banking supervision. See Basel Committee on Banking Supervision

    • Bankruptcy protection, 7.20, 14.36, App. II

    • Banks. See Deposit takers

    • Banks in distress, 2.11–2.12

    • Basel Capital Accord

    • Basel capital adequacy ratio

      • function of, 14.3–14.4

      • requirements of, Box 4.2

    • Basel Committee on Banking Supervision

    • Basel Concordat

    • Basel core principles, 13.28–13.36

    • BCBS. See Basel Committee on Banking Supervision

    • BCP. See Basel core principles

    • Bid-ask spread

      • calculation of, 8.44–8.49

      • converting from yield quotes into price terms, Box 8.1

      • defined, App. VII

      • monitoring, 14.21

    • BIS. See Bank for International Settlements

    • BLCP. See “Bank Loan Classification and Provisioning Practices in Selected Developed and Emerging Countries”

    • Bond market

      • overview, 2.23

    • BPM5. See Balance of Payments Manual, fifth edition

    • Branches, 3.37

    • Brass plate companies, 3.39–3.40

    • Brokers

    • Buy-backs, 4.54

    • CAMELS framework

    • Capital. See also Regulatory capital

      • regulatory definition, 4.68

    • Capital adequacy, 14.3–14.5

    • Capital adequacy ratio

    • Capital and reserves

      • compared with regulatory capital, 4.75

      • compiling consolidated data, 5.89–5.90

      • defined, 4.62, App. VII

      • for deposit takers, 4.9, 4.63–4.65

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.114

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

      • valuation and provisioning, Box 4.4

    • Capital-based financial soundness indicators, 6.13–6.44

    • Capital ratios, 14.3–14.4

    • Capital to assets, 6.20–6.21

    • Central bank

      • overview, 2.13

    • Central tendency, 15.18–15.19

    • Collateral, 4.45, 4.122, App. V

    • Commercial banks. See Deposit takers

    • Commercial real estate indices, 9.28–9.30

    • Commercial real estate loans, 4.88, 6.61–6.62, App. II, App. III, App. IV

    • Commissions. See Fees and commissions

    • Committee on Payment and Settlement Systems

    • Comparison ratios, 15.31–15.33

    • Computer systems, Box 10.1

    • Connected lending, 4.95, 14.9

    • Consolidated-based approach

      • compiling sector-level data, 5.45–5.50

      • data requirements, 11.46–11.50

      • deposit takers, 5.51–5.92

      • flows and positions in the non-deposit-taking sectors, Box 5.2

      • interbank flows and positions, Box 5.1

      • issues, 5.40–5.44

      • overview, 5.15

    • Consolidated group reporting

      • applying to FSI data, 5.29–5.39

      • overview, 5.16

    • Consolidation

      • combined with aggregation, 5.5

      • defined, 5.4, App. VII

      • overview, 5.1–5.2

      • of sectorwide capital, App. V

      • survey of practices, App. I

    • Contagion

    • Contingencies

    • Contingent items, 3.12

    • Convexity

    • Core capital, Box 4.2

    • Core financial soundness indicators, 1.1, 1.11, App. II

    • Corporate income taxes, 4.105

    • Corporate net foreign exchange exposure, 4.118, 7.17–7.18

    • Credit commitments, 3.16

    • Credit risk

    • Cross-border consolidated data, 5.17, 11.51–11.56, Box 5.3

    • Currency

      • domestic, 3.44–3.47

      • foreign, 3.44–3.46, 3.48, App. IV

      • overview, 4.40

    • Current transfers, 4.120, App. IV

    • Customer deposits, 4.42, 4.44, 6.50–6.51, 14.18, App. II

    • Data compilation systems, Box 10.1

    • Data requirements

      • deposit takers, 11.17–11.56

      • nonfinancial corporations, 11.63–11.70

      • other financial corporations, 11.57–11.62

    • Data series

      • availability of data, 11.71–11.73

      • breaks in, 11.74–11.77

    • Data sources

      • deposit takers, 11.4–11.11

      • households, 11.13–11.16

      • nonfinancial corporations, 11.13–11.16

      • other financial corporations, 11.12

    • Databases, Box 10.1

    • Dealing accounts, 4.23

    • Debt

    • Debt collateralized by real estate, 4.122

    • Debt securities, 4.46, 4.51–4.53, App. IV

    • Debt service payments, 4.117, 4.122, 7.15–7.16

    • Debt to capital ratio, App. III

    • Demand deposits, App. V

    • Deposit insurance scheme

    • Deposit money corporations, 2.5

    • Deposit takers

      • accounting principles for calculating FSIs, 6.1–6.3

      • calculation of FSIs, 6.5–6.8, App. V

      • compiling consolidated data, 5.51–5.92

      • consolidated group reporting, 5.31–5.35

      • data requirements, 11.17–11.56

      • data sources, 11.4–11.11

      • definitions of FSIs, App. III

      • dissemination of FSI data, 12.11–12.17

      • financial soundness indicators, 6.9–6.76, App. II

      • financial statements, 4.16–4.95

      • memorandum series, 4.66–4.95, App. III

      • overview, 2.4–2.12

      • underlying series for calculating FSIs, 6.4

      • uses of FSIs, 14.2–14.28

    • Depository corporations, App. I

    • Deposits

      • for deposit takers, 4.41–4.44

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

      • volatility, 4.43

    • Depreciation, App. IV

    • Derivatives, 14.11. See also Financial derivatives

    • Descriptive statistics, 15.12–15.51

    • Disclosure, App. V

    • Dispersion in interbank rates, 14.25

    • Dispersion measures, 15.17–15.51

    • Dividends

      • for deposit takers, 4.36

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

    • Domestic consolidated data, 5.25–5.28, 11.19–11.20, App. V, Box 5.3

    • Domestic control, 5.10–5.12

    • Domestic currencies, 3.44–3.47

    • Domestically controlled cross-border consolidated data, 5.18–5.19, 5.31–5.35

    • Domestically controlled cross-sector consolidated data, 5.20–5.21

    • Double leveraging of capital

    • Duration analysis, 3.51–3.56, 14.27, App. III, App. V

    • Early warning system, 13.12

    • Earnings, 14.12–14.16

    • Earnings before interest and tax, 4.116, 14.33–14.34

    • EBIT. See Earnings before interest and tax

    • Electronic trading systems, 13.34

    • Embedded derivatives, 4.59

    • Encouraged financial soundness indicators, 1.1, 1.11, App. II

    • End-period interest rates, 8.12

    • Equity. See Capital and reserves; Shares and other equity

    • Equity investments, Box 5.1

    • Equity market

      • overview, 2.24

    • EWS. See Early warning system

    • Exchange rate conversion, 3.44, 3.48

    • Exchanges, 13.34, App. VII

    • Expenses. See Income and expense statements

    • External Debt Statistics: Guide for Compilers and Users, Box 4.1

    • Extraordinary items

      • for deposit takers, 4.35

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.105

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

    • Fees and commissions

      • expenses, 4.30

      • income from, 4.20–4.21

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

    • Finance companies

    • Financial assets and liabilities

      • for deposit takers, 4.38–4.65

      • gross positions in financial derivatives to capital, 6.39–6.40, App. II

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.111–4.114

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

      • valuation and provisioning, Box 4.4

    • Financial auxiliaries

    • Financial conglomerates, App. III

    • Financial corporations

      • central bank, 2.13

      • deposit takers, 2.4–2.12

      • other financial corporations, 2.14

    • Financial derivatives

      • classification of, 4.52

      • embedded derivatives, 4.59

      • forward-type contracts, 4.57

      • option contracts, 4.58

      • overview, 2.25

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

      • types of, 4.56

    • Financial guarantee corporations

    • Financial intermediaries

      • overview, 2.14

    • Financial lease, 4.47

    • Financial leasing companies

    • Financial markets

      • bond market, 2.23

      • converting bid-ask spreads from yield quotes into price terms, Box 8.1

      • defined, 2.20

      • equity market, 2.24

      • financial derivatives, 2.25

      • financial soundness indicators, App. III

      • interbank market, 2.22

      • interest rates, 8.2–8.24

      • liquidity, 2.26

      • money market, 2.21

      • overview, 8.1

      • securities markets, 8.25–8.49

      • structural indicators, 8.50–8.53

    • Financial Sector Assessment Program

    • Financial soundness indicators

      • accounting principles for, 3.1–3.56

      • asset-based, 6.45–6.68

      • availability of data, 11.71–11.73

      • Basel core principles and, 13.28–13.36

      • breaks in data series, 11.74–11.77

      • calculating, App. V

      • calculating ratios, 1.15

      • capital-based, 6.13–6.44

      • comparability, 1.4

      • compilation issues, 11.1–11.3

      • compilation of, 1.20–1.22, 10.1–10.37, Box 10.1

      • core and encouraged sets, 1.11

      • data requirements, 11.17–11.70

      • data sources, 11.4–11.16

      • differences in approach from existing frameworks, Box 4.1

      • dissemination of data, 1.23, 10.1–10.37, 12.1–12.25

      • financial stability framework, 13.11–13.14

      • function of, 1.2–1.3, 13.3–13.10

      • importance of, 1.13–1.14

      • income- and expense-based, 6.69–6.76

      • linkages among FSIs, 13.15–13.22

      • for nonfinancial corporations, App. V

      • numerical examples, App. V

      • relationship with monetary and financial statistics, Box 11.1

      • seasonal adjustment, 11.78

      • stress testing, 13.23–13.27, Box 13.1

      • structure of Guide, 1.26–1.29

      • terminology, 1.30

      • uses of, 14.1–14.41, App. I

    • Financial Stability Forum

    • Financial statements

      • balance sheet, 4.9–4.12

      • for deposit takers, 4.16–4.95

      • for households, 4.119–4.122

      • income and expense statement, 4.8

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.99–4.118

      • for other financial corporations, 4.96–4.98

      • overview, 4.1–4.7

      • sectoral, 4.13–4.15

    • Financial systems

      • financial corporations, 2.4–2.14

      • financial markets, 2.20–2.26

      • general government, 2.18

      • households, 2.16

      • monitoring strength of, 1.6–1.12

      • nonfinancial corporations, 2.15

      • nonprofit institutional serving households, 2.17

      • overview, 2.1–2.3

      • payment system, 2.27

      • public sector, 2.19

      • real estate markets, 2.28

    • Fixed assets

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.107

    • Flows and positions. See also Positions

      • defined, 3.2

      • interbank, App. V, Box 5.1

      • intragroup, App. V

      • in the non-deposit-taking sectors, Box 5.2

      • time of recognition, 3.3–3.9

    • Foreign control, 5.10–5.12

    • Foreign-controlled cross-border consolidated data, 5.22–5.24

    • Foreign currencies, 3.44–3.46, 3.48, App. IV

    • Foreign currency liabilities, 4.90, 6.67–6.68, App. II, App. III

    • Foreign currency loans, 4.90, 6.65–6.66, 14.10, App. II, App. III

    • Foreign exchange companies

    • Foreign exchange exposure, 14.28, 14.35

    • Foreign exchange gains, 6.71–6.72, App. II

    • Forward-type contracts, 4.57

    • FSAP. See Financial Sector Assessment Program

    • FSF. See Financial Stability Forum

    • FSIs. See Financial soundness indicators

    • Funds contributed by owners, 4.63

    • G-10. See Group of Ten countries

    • Gains on financial instruments

      • for deposit takers, 4.20, 4.22–4.27

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.104, App. V

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

    • Gap model, App. V

    • GDP. See Gross domestic product

    • General government, 2.18

    • General provisions, 4.32–4.33

    • General reserves, 4.63

    • Geographic distribution of loans, 4.89, 6.63–6.64, 14.8, App. II, App. III, App. IV

    • Gini Index, 15.15–15.16

    • Global Financial Stability Report

    • Global note facilities, 3.17

    • Glossary of terms, App. VII

    • GNFs. See Global note facilities

    • Gold swap, 4.48

    • Goods and services

    • Goodwill

      • capital adequacy ratio calculation, Box 4.2

      • compiling consolidated data, 5.91–5.92

      • nonfinancial corporations and, 4.110

      • in sector-wide capital, App. V

    • Government, general, 2.18

    • Government Finance Statistics Manual, Box 4.1

    • Gross disposable income, 4.120, App. IV

    • Gross domestic product, 7.7, 7.23

    • Gross income, 4.20

    • Group of Ten countries, App. VII, Box 4.2

    • Guarantees, App. V

    • Hedonic price indices

      • advantages of, 9.25–9.26

      • defined, App. VII

    • Herfindahl Index

      • calculation of, 15.13–15.14

      • defined, App. VII

    • Holding corporations, 2.9

    • Households

      • calculation of FSIs, 7.1–7.3, 7.21–7.26

      • data sources, 11.13–11.16

      • debt, 7.23–7.26, App. II, App. III

      • financial soundness indicators, App. II

      • financial statements, 4.119–4.122

      • overview, 2.16

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

      • residence, 3.41

      • uses of FSIs, 14.37–14.39

    • Hui-Heubel Ratio

    • IASB. See International Accounting Standards Board

    • IASs. See International accounting standards

    • IBS. See International banking statistics

    • IFIs. See Islamic financial institutions

    • IFRS. See International Financial Reporting Standard

    • IFSB. See Islamic Financial Services Board

    • Immediacy, 8.29

    • Income

      • interest income, 4.17–4.19, 4.103

      • net income, 4.34, 4.103

      • net income after tax, 4.35, 4.105

      • noninterest income, 4.20–4.27

      • operating income, 4.100

      • other income, 4.29

      • prorated earnings, 4.28

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

      • sources, 4.120

    • Income- and expense-based financial soundness indicators, 6.69–6.76

    • Income and expense series, 11.22–11.24

    • Income and expense statements

      • compiling consolidated data, 5.51–5.92

      • for deposit takers, 4.16–4.36

      • for households, 4.120

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.100–4.105, App. V

      • overview, 4.8

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

      • valuation and provisioning, Box 4.4

    • Income taxes

      • corporate, 4.105

      • for deposit takers, 4.35

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

    • Institutional units

      • overview, 2.2

    • Insurance auxiliaries

    • Insurance corporations

    • Insurance technical reserves, 4.97, App. IV

    • Interbank flows and positions, Box 5.1

    • Interbank loans

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

    • Interbank market

      • overview, 2.22

    • Interbank stress testing, Box 13.1

    • Interest cost, 4.17

    • Interest income

      • for deposit takers, 4.17–4.19

      • interest margin to gross income, 6.69–6.70, App. II, App. III

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.103, 4.115

    • Interest rates

      • average-period, 8.12

      • end-period, 8.12

      • overview, 8.2–8.4

      • risk, App. V

      • spread between reference lending and deposit rates, 8.5–8.20

      • spread between the highest and lowest interbank rates, 8.21–8.24

    • Internal Ratings Based approach

    • International accounting standards

    • International Accounting Standards Board, 1.16, App. IV, Box 4.1

    • International banking statistics

    • International Financial Reporting Standards, 1.16, 3.7, 3.23, Box 4.1, Tables 11.9 and 11.10, App. IV

    • International Standard Industrial Classification, App. III

    • Inventories

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.108

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

    • Investment funds

    • IRB. See Internal Ratings Based approach

    • ISIC. See International Standard Industrial Classification

    • Islamic financial institutions, Box 4.3

    • Islamic Financial Services Board

    • Joint ventures, 5.9

    • Kurtosis

    • Large exposures, 4.76, 6.27–6.30, App. II, App. III, App. IV

    • Laspeyres index

    • Laspeyres real estate indices, 9.20–9.24

    • Leasing companies. See Financial leasing companies

    • Legal issues, 10.20–10.23

    • Letters of credits, 3.15

    • Leverage

    • Liabilities. See also Financial assets and liabilities

    • Lines of credit, 3.16

    • Liquid asset ratio, 6.45–6.46

    • Liquid assets, 4.78–4.82, 14.18, App. II, App. IV

    • Liquid assets to short-term liabilities, 6.47–6.49, 14.18, App. II, App. III

    • Liquidity

      • defined, App. VII

      • importance of, 2.26, 14.17–14.25

    • Liquidity-adjusted real estate indices, 9.27

    • Liquidity risk

    • Loan guarantees, 3.14

    • Loan-loss provisions

      • defined, App. VII

      • for deposit takers, 4.32–4.33

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

      • tax treatment, App. V

    • Loans

      • classification, App. V

      • concentration in specific economic sector, 14.7

      • for deposit takers, 4.45–4.50

      • foreign currency, 4.90, 6.65–6.66, 14.10, App. II, App. III

      • geographic distribution, 4.89, 6.63–6.64, 14.8, App. II, App. III, App. IV

      • nonperforming, 1.25, 4.84–4.87

      • real estate, 4.88, 6.58–6.62, App. II, App. III, App. IV

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

      • replacement, 4.86

      • review practices, App. V

      • sectoral distribution to total loans, 6.56–6.57, App. II, App. III

    • LoC. See Letters of credits

    • Lock-in provisions, 4.72

    • Long-term maturity, 3.49

    • Lorenz curve, 15.15

    • Losses on financial instruments

      • for deposit takers, 4.20, 4.22–4.27

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.104, App. V

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

    • Macroprudential analysis

      • defined, App. VII

      • financial soundness indicators and, 13.1–13.36

      • importance of, 1.10

      • overview, 1.6–1.7, 1.17–1.20, 1.24

    • Managerial issues, 10.24–10.37, Box 10.1

    • Market depth

      • defined, 8.27, App. VII

      • depiction of, 8.28

      • measuring, 8.33–8.38

    • Market exchange rate, 3.48

    • Market liquidity, 14.20, App. II

    • Market risk

      • defined, App. VII

      • sensitivity to, 14.26–14.28

    • Market tightness

      • defined, 8.27–8.28, App. VII

      • measuring, 8.33–8.38

    • Market transparency, 8.32

    • Market valuation. See Valuation methods

    • Maturity, 3.49–3.55

      • original, 3.50

      • remaining, 3.50

      • residual, 3.50

    • Mean, 15.18

    • Median, 15.19

    • Median real estate prices, 9.18

    • Memorandum series

      • for deposit takers, 4.66–4.95, App. III

      • for households, 4.122

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.115–4.118, App. III

    • Metadata, 12.23

    • MFSM. See Monetary and Financial Statistics Manual

    • Microprudential analysis

      • overview, 1.7

    • Mode, 15.19

    • Mode real estate prices, 9.18

    • Monetary and Financial Statistics Manual, Box 4.1, Box 4.3, Box 11.1

    • Money market

      • overview, 2.21

    • Money market funds

      • overview, 2.10, 2.14

    • Mortgage-backed securities, App. V

    • Mortgages, App. V

    • Mudarabah concept, Box 4.3

    • Multiple exchange rate system, 3.48

    • Multiple options facilities, 3.17

    • National accounts. See System of national accounts

    • Net income after tax, 4.35, 4.105

    • Net interest income, 4.17–4.18

    • Net open position

    • Net worth, App. IV

    • New business, 8.13–8.14

    • NIFs. See Note issuance facilities

    • 1993 SNA. See System of National Accounts, 1993

    • Nondepository financial institutions, App. I

    • Nonfinancial assets

      • for deposit takers, 4.37

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.106–4.110

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

    • Nonfinancial corporations

      • calculation of FSIs, 7.1–7.3, 7.8–7.20, App. V

      • consolidated group reporting, 5.38–5.39

      • data requirements, 11.63–11.70

      • data sources, 11.13–11.16

      • debt service, App. III

      • dissemination of FSI data, 12.23–12.25

      • earnings to interest and principal expenses, 4.99–4.118, App. II

      • financial soundness indicators, App. II

      • financial statements, 4.99–4.118

      • flows and positions, Box 5.2

      • memorandum series, 4.115–4.118, App. III

      • net foreign exchange exposure to equity, 4.99–4.118, App. II, App. III

      • overview, 2.15

      • return on equity, 4.99–4.118, App. II, App. III

      • total debt to equity, 4.99–4.118, App. II, App. III

      • uses of FSIs, 14.31–14.36

    • Noninterbank loans

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

    • Noninterest expenses, 4.30–4.31, 6.73–6.74, App. II, App. III, App. IV

    • Noninterest income, 4.20–4.27

    • Nonperforming loans

      • classification of, 4.84–4.87

      • interest, App. V

      • interest rates, 8.15–8.16

      • net of specific provisions to capital, 6.22–6.24, 14.5, App. II, App. III

      • ratio to total gross loans, 6.54–6.55, 14.6, App. II, App. III

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

      • stress testing, 1.25

    • Nonproduced assets, App. IV

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.106, 4.110

    • Nonprofit institutional serving households

      • overview, 2.17

    • Nontransferable deposits, 4.41

    • Note issuance facilities, 3.17

    • Notional amount

    • NPISHs. See Nonprofit institutional serving households

    • NPLs. See Nonperforming loans

    • Numerical examples, App. V

    • OFCs. See Other financial corporations

    • Off-balance-sheet operations, 14.11

    • Offshore units, 3.38

    • Operating income, 4.100, 4.120

    • Option contracts, 4.58

    • Order-driven markets, 8.31

    • OTCs. See Over-the-counter markets

    • Other depository corporations. See Deposit takers

    • Other financial corporations

      • assets to gross domestic product, 4.96–4.98, App. II

      • assets to total financial system assets, 4.96–4.98, App. II, App. III

      • calculation of FSIs, 7.1–7.7

      • consolidated group reporting, 5.36–5.37

      • data requirements, 11.57–11.62

      • data sources, 11.12

      • dissemination of FSI data, 12.18–12.22

      • financial soundness indicators, App. II

      • financial statements, 4.96–4.98

      • flows and positions, Box 5.2

      • memorandum series, App. III

      • overview, 2.14

      • uses of FSIs, 14.29–14.30

    • Outstanding business, 8.13–8.14

    • Over-the-counter markets, 13.34

    • Overall interest spread, 8.5

    • Ownership of land and structures residence, 3.42

    • Payment guarantees, 3.14

    • Payment system

      • overview, 2.27

    • Peer group analysis, 15.1–15.11

    • Pension auxiliaries

    • Pension funds

    • Percentiles, 15.38–15.41

    • Performance bonds, 3.15

    • Persistence, 15.45–15.47

    • Personnel costs, 4.31, 6.75–6.76, App. II, App. IV

    • PLS. See Profit and loss sharing

    • Positions. See also Flows and positions

      • market value, 3.25–3.33

    • Price discovery

    • Prorated earnings, 4.28, App. IV

    • Produced assets, 4.106–4.109, App. IV

    • Profit and loss sharing, Box 4.3

    • Profitability, 14.12–14.16

    • Property income receivable, 4.120

    • Protection from creditors applications, 7.20, 14.36, App. II

    • Provisioning, App. V, Box 4.4

    • Provisions, 4.63

    • Public corporation

      • defined, 2.19

    • Public exchanges

    • Public sector

      • overview, 2.19

    • Quality-adjusted regression price indices, 9.25–9.26

    • Quality control, 10.18–10.19, 10.37

    • Quote-driven markets, 8.31

    • Range, 15.20, 15.36–15.37

    • RAROC. See Risk-adjusted return on capital

    • Ratio of capital to assets, 14.3, App. II

    • Real estate loans, 4.88, 6.58–6.62, App. II, App. III, App. IV

    • Real estate markets

      • constructing price measures, 9.16–9.30

      • financial soundness indicators, App. II

      • measuring prices, 9.4–9.11

      • overview, 2.28

      • price indices, 9.1–9.30, App. II

      • structural indicators, 9.12–9.15

      • uses of FSIs, 14.40–14.41

    • Red Book

    • Regulatory capital

      • compared with capital and reserves, 4.75

      • defined, App. VII

      • requirements, 4.68

      • risk-weighted assets, 4.68, 4.74, 6.17–6.18, App. II

      • supervisory deductions, 4.73

      • tiers of, 4.69–4.72

    • Rentals

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.104

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

    • Rents

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.104

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

    • Replacement loans, 4.86

    • Repo. See Repurchase agreements

    • Repurchase agreements, 4.48–4.49

    • Reserves. See Capital and reserves

    • Residence

      • aspects of, 3.37–3.43

      • concept of, 3.34–3.36

      • geographic distribution of loans, 4.89

    • Residential real estate loans, 4.88, 6.58–6.60, App. II, App. III, App. IV

    • Resilience

    • Retained earnings

      • compiling consolidated data, 5.76–5.79

      • for deposit takers, 4.36, 4.63

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.105

    • Return on assets, 6.52–6.53, 14.12–14.13, App. II

    • Return on equity, 6.25–6.26, 7.12–7.14, 14.12–14.13, App. III

    • Revenues from sales of goods and services, App. IV

    • Revolving underwriting facilities, 3.17

    • Risk-adjusted return on capital, 14.16

    • Risk exposures

    • Risk-weighted assets

      • capital adequacy ratio calculation, Box 4.2

      • defined, App. VII

      • regulatory capital requirements, 4.68, 4.74, 6.17–6.18, App. II

    • ROA. See Return on assets

    • ROE. See Return on equity

    • Royalty income receivable, 4.104, App. IV

    • RUFs. See Revolving underwriting facilities

    • Salaries, 4.120

    • Sales of goods and services, App. IV

    • SDDS. See Special Data Dissemination Standard

    • Seasonal factors, 11.78

    • Securities dealers

    • Securities lending, 4.48–4.49

    • Securities markets

      • bid-ask spread, 8.44–8.49

      • defined, App. VII

      • immediacy and resilience, 8.29

      • market depth and tightness, 8.27–8.28, 8.33–8.38

      • market structure, 8.30–8.32

      • overview, 8.25–8.26

      • turnover ratio, 8.39–8.43

    • Securities repurchase agreements, 4.48–4.49

    • Series providing analysis of balance sheet, 4.77–4.92

    • Shares and other equity

      • for deposit takers, 4.54–4.55

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.104, 4.113

      • for other financial corporations, 4.98

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

    • Shell companies, 3.39–3.40

    • Short-term liabilities, 4.83, App. IV

    • Short-term maturity, 3.49

    • SIR. See Spread between the highest and lowest interbank rates

    • Skewness

    • SLDR. See Spread between reference lending and deposit rates

    • SNA. See System of National Accounts

    • Special Data Dissemination Standard, App. I

    • Special purpose entities, 3.39–3.40

    • Special reserves, 4.63

    • Specialized financial intermediaries defined, App. VII

    • Specific loan provisions, 4.50

    • SPEs. See Special purpose entities

    • Spot exchange rate, 3.48

    • Spread between reference lending and deposit rates, 8.5–8.20, 14.14, App. II, App. III

    • Spread between the highest and lowest interbank rates, 8.21–8.24, App. II

    • Standard deviation, 15.20

    • Stock market indices, App. III

    • Strategic issues, 10.2–10.23

    • Stress testing, 1.25, 13.23–13.27, App. V, Box 13.1

    • Subsidiaries, 3.37, 5.6–5.7, 5.9

    • Supervisory-based series, 4.67–4.76

    • Supervisory deductions, 4.73

    • Survey on the Use, Compilation, and Dissemination of Macroprudential Indicators, App. I

    • Survivor bias, 5.38

    • System of National Accounts, Box 4.1

    • System of National Accounts, 1993, 1.16, App. IV, Box 4.1

    • Tails of distribution, 15.35

    • Taxes, App. IV. See also Income taxes

    • Terminology, 1.30

    • Tier-1 capital, 4.64, 4.70, 6.19, App. II, Box 4.2

    • Tier-2 capital, 4.71, Box 4.2

    • Tier-3 capital, 4.72, Box 4.2

    • Total debt to equity, 7.10–7.11, 14.32

    • Trade credits

      • for deposit takers, 4.60

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.112

      • reconciliation and the Guide’s methodology, App. IV

    • Trading gains, 6.71–6.72, App. II

    • Transactions, 3.24

    • Transferable deposits, 4.41

    • Triennial Central Bank Survey

    • Turnover ratio

      • average daily trade in securities markets, App. II

      • calculation of, 8.39–8.43, 14.22

      • defined, App. VII

    • Unconsolidated subsidiaries, 5.43

    • Unit of account, 3.48

    • Unit value real estate prices, 9.16–9.17

    • Unrestricted investment accounts, Box 4.3

    • Valuables

      • for nonfinancial corporations, 4.109

    • Valuation adjustment, 4.63

    • Valuation methods, 3.20–3.23, Box 4.4

    • Variability, 15.20

    • Variance

    • Variation in distribution, 15.43–15.44

    • Vehicle companies

    • Volatility

      • defined, App. VII

      • of deposits, 4.43

      • monitoring resilience to, 1.8

    • Wages, 4.120

    • Weighting, 15.23–15.33

      You are not logged in and do not have access to this content. Please login or, to subscribe to IMF eLibrary, please click here

      Other Resources Citing This Publication