Back Matter

Back Matter

Author(s):
International Monetary Fund
Published Date:
April 2012
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    Appendix Classification of Economies by Region and Income, Fiscal 2012
    East Asia and Pacific
    American SamoaUMC
    CambodiaLIC
    ChinaUMC
    FijiLMC
    IndonesiaLMC
    KiribatiLMC
    Korea, Dem. Rep.LIC
    Lao PDRLMC
    MalaysiaUMC
    Marshall IslandsLMC
    Micronesia, Fed. Sts.LMC
    MongoliaLMC
    MyanmarLIC
    PanamaUMC
    Papua New GuineaLMC
    PhilippinesLMC
    SamoaLMC
    Solomon IslandsLMC
    ThailandUMC
    Timor-LesteLMC
    TongaLMC
    TuvaluLMC
    VanuatuLMC
    VietnamLMC
    Europe and Central Asia
    AlbaniaUMC
    ArmeniaLMC
    AzerbaijanUMC
    BelarusUMC
    Bosnia and HerzegovinaUMC
    BulgariaUMC
    GeorgiaLMC
    KazakhstanUMC
    KosovoLMC
    Kyrgyz RepublicLIC
    LatviaUMC
    LithuaniaUMC
    Macedonia, FYRUMC
    MoldovaLMC
    MontenegroUMC
    RomaniaUMC
    Russian FederationUMC
    SerbiaUMC
    TajikistanLIC
    TurkeyUMC
    TurkmenistanLMC
    UkraineLMC
    UzbekistanLMC
    Latin America and the Caribbean
    Antigua and BarbudaUMC
    ArgentinaUMC
    BelizeLMC
    BoliviaLMC
    BrazilUMC
    ChileUMC
    ColombiaUMC
    Costa RicaUMC
    CubaUMC
    DominicaUMC
    Dominican RepublicUMC
    EcuadorUMC
    El SalvadorLMC
    GrenadaUMC
    GuatemalaLMC
    GuyanaLMC
    HaitiLIC
    HondurasLMC
    JamaicaUMC
    MexicoUMC
    NicaraguaLMC
    Antigua and BarbudaUMC
    ArgentinaUMC
    BelizeLMC
    BoliviaLMC
    St. LuciaUMC
    St. Vincent and the GrenadinesUMC
    SurinameUMC
    UruguayUMC
    Venezuela, RBUMC
    Middle East and North Africa
    AlgeriaUMC
    DjiboutiLMC
    Egypt, Arab Rep.LMC
    Iran, Islamic Rep.UMC
    IraqLMC
    JordanUMC
    LebanonUMC
    LibyaUMC
    MoroccoLMC
    Syrian Arab RepublicLMC
    TunisiaUMC
    West Bank and GazaLMC
    Yemen, Rep.LMC
    South Asia
    AfghanistanLIC
    BangladeshLIC
    BhutanLMC
    IndiaLMC
    MaldivesUMC
    NepalLIC
    PakistanLMC
    Sri LankaLMC
    Sub-Saharan Africa
    AngolaLMC
    BeninLIC
    BotswanaUMC
    Burkina FasoLIC
    BurundiLIC
    CameroonLMC
    Cape VerdeLMC
    Central African RepublicLIC
    ChadLIC
    ComorosLIC
    Congo, Dem. Rep.LIC
    Congo, Rep.LMC
    Côte d’IvoireLMC
    EritreaLIC
    EthiopiaLIC
    GabonUMC
    Gambia, TheLIC
    GhanaLMC
    GuineaLIC
    Guinea-BissauLIC
    KenyaLIC
    LesothoLMC
    LiberiaLIC
    MadagascarLIC
    MalawiLIC
    MaliLIC
    MauritaniaLMC
    MauritiusUMC
    MayotteUMC
    MozambiqueLIC
    NamibiaUMC
    NigerLIC
    NigeriaLMC
    RwandaLIC
    São Tomé and PrincipeLMC
    SenegalLMC
    SeychellesUMC
    Sierra LeoneLIC
    SomaliaLIC
    South AfricaUMC
    SudanLMC
    SwazilandLMC
    TanzaniaLIC
    TogoLIC
    UgandaLIC
    ZambiaLMC
    ZimbabweLIC
    High-income OECD Economics
    Australia
    Austria
    Belgium
    Canada
    Czech Republic
    Denmark
    Estonia
    Finland
    France
    Germany
    Greece
    Hungary
    Iceland
    Ireland
    Israel
    Italy
    Japan
    Korea, Rep.
    Luxembourg
    Netherlands
    New Zealand
    Norway
    Poland
    Portugal
    Slovak Republic
    Slovenia
    Spain
    Sweden
    Switzerland
    United Kingdom
    United States
    Other high-income economies
    Andorra
    Aruba
    Bahamas, The
    Bahrain
    Barbados
    Bermuda
    Brunei Darussalam
    Cayman Islands
    Channel Islands
    Croatia
    Curaçao
    Cyprus
    Equatorial Guinea
    Faeroe Islands
    French Polynesia
    Gibraltar
    Greenland
    Guam
    Hong Kong SAR, China
    Isle of Man
    Kuwait
    Liechtenstein
    Macao SAR, China
    Malta
    Monaco
    New Caledonia
    Northern Mariana Islands
    Oman
    Puerto Rico
    Qatar
    San Marino
    Saudi Arabia
    Singapore
    Sint Maarten (Dutch part)
    St. Martin (French part)
    Taiwan, China
    Trinidad and Tobago
    Turks and Caicos Islands
    United Arab Emirates
    Virgin Islands (U.S.)
    Note: This table classifies all World Bank member economies, and all other economies with populations of more than 30,000. Economies are divided among income groups according to 2010 GNI per capita, calculated using the World Bank Atlas method. The groups are: low income, $1,005 or less; lower middle income, $1,006-$3,975; upper middle income, $3,976-$12,275; and high income, $12,276 or more.Source: World Bank data.

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    What has been the impact of yet another food price spike on developing countries’ ability to make progress toward the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)? How many poor people have been prevented from lifting themselves out of poverty? How many people, and how many children, have seen their personal growth and development permanently harmed because their families could not afford to buy food? Finally, what can countries do to respond to higher and more volatile food prices? Global Monitoring Report 2012: Food Prices, Nutrition, and the Millennium Development Goals examines these questions. It summarizes the effects of food prices on several MDGs, stressing that recent food price spikes have prevented millions of households from escaping extreme poverty. The report advocates using agricultural policy to orchestrate a supply response; deploying social safety nets to improve resilience; strengthening nutritional policy to manage the implications of early childhood development; and implementing trade policy to improve access to food markets, reduce volatility, and induce productivity gains. The report acknowledges that one size does not fit all and that sequencing and prioritizing various policy initiatives depend critically on the initial situation a country or region finds itself in. It also discusses support by the international community.

    The world has met two global MDG targets well before the 2015 deadline. Estimates based on preliminary surveys indicate that the share of people living in extreme poverty in 2010 was half what it was in 1990. The world has also halved the share of people with no safe drinking water. The goal of gender parity in primary and secondary education is on track to be met in 2015, and the goal of ensuring that children everywhere—boys and girls alike—are able to complete primary school is nearly on track. But the MDGs closely linked to food and nutrition, particularly those that aim to reduce child and maternal mortality, are lagging.

    Global Monitoring Report 2012 was prepared jointly by the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, with consultations and collaborations with regional development banks and other multilateral partners.

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