La gouvernance du FMI : Évaluation

Back Matter

Back Matter

Author(s):
International Monetary Fund. Independent Evaluation Office
Published Date:
November 2008
    Share
    • ShareShare
    Show Summary Details
    Bibliographie

      Africa Group I Constituency, 2003, “Working Rules and Procedures for Africa Group I Constituency in the IMF and World Bank.” (Washington: International Monetary Fund and the World Bank Group).

      Association française des entreprises privées (AFEP) et Mouvement des entreprises de France (MEDEF), 1999, “Rapport du Comité sur le gouvernement d’entreprise présidé par Marc Viénot(Rapport Viénot), Juillet (France, Association française des Entreprises privées (AFEP) et Mouvement des entreprises de France (MEDEF).

      Banque des règlements internationaux, 2004, “Review of the Governance of the Bank for International Settlements,” (Bâle: Banque des règlements internationaux).

      Birla, ShriKumarMangalam, 2000, “Report of the Kumar Mangalam Birla Committee on Corporate Governance” (Mumbai: Securities and Exchange Board of India).

      Blagescu, Monica, Lucy deLas Casas, and RobertLloyd, 2005, “Pathways to Accountability: the GAP Framework,” (London: One World Trust).

      BoardSource, 2004, Non-Profit Governance Index 2004 (Washington: Board Source).

      Boorman, Jack, 2007, “IMF Reform: Congruence with Global Governance Reform”, Chapter 1, Global Governance Reform: Breaking the Stalemate, Colin I. Bradford and JohannesLinn, (ed)eds. (Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press).

      Bossone, Biagio, 2008aThe Design of the IMF’s Medium-Term Strategy: A Case Study on IMF Governance,” Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) Background Paper (BP/08/09) (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Bossone, Biagio, 2008b, “IMF Surveillance: A Case Study on IMF Governance,” Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) Background Paper (BP/08/010) (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Bossone, Biagio, 2008c, “Integrating Macroeconomic and Financial Sector Analyses within IMF Surveillance: A Case Study on IMF Governance,” Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) Background Paper (BP/08/11) (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Bretton Woods Project, 2006, “European CSO open statement on governance reform of the IMF,” July 17. Available via the Internet at http://www.brettonwoodsproject.org/art.shtml?x=539161

      Buira, Ariel, 2005, Reforming the Governance of the IMF and the World Bank (London: Anthem Press).

      Camdessus, Michel, 2005, “International Financial Institutions: Dealing with New Global Challenges” (Washington, DC: Per Jacobsen Foundation).

      Campbell, Katrina, 2008, “Managing Conflicts of Interest and Other Ethics Issues at the IMF,” Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) Background Paper (BP/08/12) (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Carter, Colin, and J. William Lorsch, 2003, Back to the Drawing Board: Designing Corporate Boards for a Complex World (Cambridge, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

      Chelsky, Jeff, 2008a, “Summarizing the Views of the IMF Executive Board,” Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) Background Paper (BP/08/05) (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Chelsky, Jeff, 2008b, “The Role and Evolution of Executive Board Standing Committees in IMF Corporate Governance,” Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) Background Paper (BP/08/04) (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Clark, C.Scott and JeffChelsky, 2008, “Financial Oversight of the International Monetary Fund,” Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) Background Paper (BP/08/06) (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Cortes, Mariano, 2008, “The Governance of IMF Technical Assistance,” Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) Background Paper (BP/08/13) (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Cottarelli, Carlo, 2005, “Efficiency and Legitimacy: Trade-offs in IMF Governance,” IMF Working Paper WP/05/107, June (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Dalberg Global Development Advisors, 2008, “Lessons from Private Sector Governance Practices,” Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) Background Paper (BP/08/07) (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      De Gregorio, Jose, et al., 1999, An Independent and Accountable IMF (Geneva: International Center for Monetary and Banking Studies).

      Financial Reporting Council, 2006, “Combined Code on Corporate Governance (UK)” (London: Financial Reporting Council).

      Fonds monétaire international, 1944, “Statuts du Fonds monétaire international” (Bretton Woods: Fonds monétaire international) (révisé1969, 1978, 1992).

      Fonds monétaire international, 1974, Governors Resolution 29-9, October2 (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Fonds monétaire international, 2006, “By-Laws Rules and Regulations of the International Monetary Fund”, Sixtieth Issue, May (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Forbes, 2007, “The Global 2000.” Available via the Internet at http://www.forbes.com/lists.

      Garratt, Bob, 2003, The fish rots from the head: The crisis in our boardrooms - Developing the crucial skills of a competent director (London: Profile Books).

      Government Commission German Corporate Governance Code, 2003, “German Corporate Governance Code”. Available via the Internet at http://www.ecgi.org/codes/documents/code_200305_en.pdf.

      Grant, Ruth W. and Robert O. Keohane, 2005, “Accountability and Abuses of Power in World Politics,” American Political Science Review, 99:1, February (Washington: American Political Science Review).

      Higgs, Derek, 2003, “Higgs Report on Non-executive directors: Summary Recommendations”, January. Available via the Internet at http://www.berr.gov.uk/files/file23012.pdf.

      Horsefield, J.Keith, 1969, The International Monetary Fund 1945-1965 Volume I (Washington DC: International Monetary Fund).

      Japanese Corporate Governance Committee, 2001, “Revised Corporate Governance Principles,” (Tokyo: Japan Corporate Governance Committee and Japanese Corporate Governance Forum).

      King Committee on Corporate Governance, 2002, (Executive Summary of the King Report 2002King II Report”) (Parktown, South Africa: Institute of Directors).

      King, Mervyn, 2006, “Reform of the International Monetary Fund” (New Delhi: Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations).

      Kenen, Peter B., 2007, “Reform of the International Monetary Fund”, Council on Foreign Relations, CSR Special Report No. 29 (New York: Council on Foreign Relations).

      Martinez-Diaz, Leonardo, 2008, “Executive Boards in International Organizations: Lessons for Strengthening IMF Governance,” Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) Background Paper (BP/08/08), (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      McCormick, David, 2008, “IMF Reform: Meeting the Challenges of Today’s Global Economy”, Remarks by the U.S. Treasury Under Secretary for International Affairs at the Peter G. Peterson Institute for International Economics, February 25 (Washington: Institute for International Economics).

      Mountford, Alexander, 2008a, “The Formal Governance Structure of the International Monetary Fund,” Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) Background Paper (BP/08/01) (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Mountford, Alexander, 2008b, “The Historical Development of IMF Governance,” Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) Background Paper (BP/08/02) (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      New Rules for Global Finance, 2007, “High-Level Panel on IMF Accountability: Key Findings & Recommendations” (Washington: New Rules for Global Finance).

      One World Trust, 2007a, “Addressing the International Monetary Fund’s need to improve accountability in the short-term” (London: One World Trust).

      One World Trust, 2007b. 2007 Global Accountability Report. Available via the Internet at http://www.oneworldtrust.org.

      One World Trust, 2006. 2006 Global Accountability Report. Available via the Internet at http://www.oneworldtrust.org.

      Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques, 2004, “Principes de gouvernement d’entreprise de l’OCDE” (Paris: Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques).

      Organisation des Nations Unies, 2006, “Examen global du système de gouvernance et de contrôle” (New York: Organisation des Nations Unies).

      Peretz, David, 2007, “The Process for Selecting and Appointing the Managing Director and First Deputy Managing Director of the IMF,” Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) Background Paper (BP/07/01a) (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Portugal, Murilo, 2005, “Improving IMF Governance and Increasing the Influence of Developing Countries in IMF Decision-Making” (Manila: G24 Technical Group Meeting).

      Shakow, Alexander, 2008, “The Role of the International Monetary and Financial Committee in IMF Governance,” Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) Background Paper (BP/08/03) (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      South Centre, 2007, “Reform of World Bank Governance Structures”, Analytical Note, SC/GGDP/AN/GEG/4 (Geneva: South Centre).

      Spencer Stuart, 2006a. Board Index, 2006: The Changing Profile of Directors.

      Spencer Stuart, 2006b. UK Board Index, 2006.

      Spencer Stuart, 2006c. Board Index: Italia 2006.

      Stone, Randall W., 2008, “IMF Governance and Financial Crises with Systemic Importance, (Summary),” Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) Background Paper (BP/08/014) (Washington: International Monetary Fund).

      Sutherland, Peter, et al., 2004, “The future of the WTO: Addressing institutional challenges in the new millennium”, Report by the Consultative Board to the Director-General Supachai Panitchpakdi (Geneva: World Trade Organization).

      The Committee on the Financial Aspects of Corporate Governance and Gee and Co. Ltd., 1992, “Report of the Committee on the Financial Aspects of Corporate Governance (Cadbury Report) (London: The Committee on the Financial Aspects of Corporate Governance and Gee and Co. Ltd.).

      Truman, Edwin M., 2006, A Strategy for IMF Reform (Washington: Institute for International Economics)

      Woods, Ngaire, 2006, The Globalizers: the IMF, the World Bank, and Their Borrowers (Ithaca: Cornell University Press).

    La gouvernance est aussi à l’ordre du jour d’autres organisations intergouvernementales, dont plusieurs ont procédé à des études en vue d’améliorer leurs mécanismes de gouvernance. Par exemple, des évaluations de la gouvernance ont été préparées pour l’Organisation mondiale du commerce, les Nations Unies et la Banque des règlements internationaux. Voir Sutherland et. al (2004), United Nations (2006) et Bank for International Settlements (2004).

    Ces dernières années, de nombreuses propositions de réforme de la gouvernance du FMI ont été présentées par d’anciens fonctionnaires de l’institution, des fonctionnaires de pays membres, des universitaires et des organisations non gouvernementales (ONG). Le document de référence IV présente les points saillants de quelques-uns de ces projets de réforme.

    Parmi les travaux importants sur le gouvernement d’entreprise: Recommandations du Comité sur le gouvernement d’entreprise présidé par Marc Viénot (« Rapport Viénot », France, 1999); Report of the Committee on the Financial Aspects of Corporate Governance (“Cadbury Report,” UK, 1992); Report of the Kumar Mangalam Birla Committee on Corporate Governance (India, 2000); Revised Corporate Governance Principles, Japanese Corporate Governance Committee (2001); German Corporate Governance Code (2002); King II Report on Corporate Governance for South Africa (2002); Principes de gouvernement d’entreprise de l’OCDE (2004); et UK Financial Reporting Council’s Combined Code on Corporate Governance (2006).

    Pour l’efficacité, voir Carter and Lorsch (2003), et Garratt (2003). Pour l’efficience, voir Cottarelli (2005). Pour la responsabilisation et la participation, voir Grant and Keohane (2005); et Blagescu et. al. (2005).

    De manière plus large, l’efficience met en rapport les coûts et les bénéfices. Dans le présent rapport, toutefois, les bénéfices sont pris en compte dans les trois autres dimensions et l’efficience ne porte que sur le coût de fonctionnement des différentes entités de gouvernance.

    Ces normes sont décrites dans deux documents de référence (Martinez-Diaz, 2008, and Dalberg, 2008) qui sont disponibles sur le site Web du BIE (www.ieo-imf.org).

    Ces documents sont énumérés, avec des résumés, à l’annexe 2, et sont affichés sur le site Web du BIE. Bien qu’ils aient été utilisés dans cette évaluation, ils représentent les vues de leurs auteurs et pas nécessairement celles du BIE ou de l’équipe d’évaluation.

    Une équipe d’évaluation a organisé des ateliers, des groupes de travail et des entrevues structurées avec de hauts fonctionnaires de plus de 25 pays, 29 administrateurs actuels et antérieurs, et environ 25 autres membres actuels et antérieurs du Conseil, 8 membres actuels ou antérieurs de la Direction, plus de 50 membres actuels ou antérieurs des services du FMI, 22 représentants d’organisations de la société civile et 38 fonctionnaires d’autres organisations internationales. Le questionnaire utilisé pour les entrevues structurées figure dans le document de référence III.

    Le document de référence 1 décrit l’enquête et présente ses principales conclusions. Le document de référence II présente le questionnaire envoyé aux organisations de la société civile et l’annexe 4 résume leurs vues.

    Les documents de référence V.1, V.2 et V.3 contiennent des matrices avec des observations détaillées pour chaque dimension et chaque organe de gouvernance, ainsi que des références aux sources de données correspondantes.

    Les organisations intergouvernementales qui regroupent presque tous les pays du monde ont généralement entre 32 et 36 administrateurs, contre 24 pour le FMI. Voir Martinez-Diaz (2008).

    Il serait peu réaliste pour les 185 membres du Conseil des gouverneurs d’évaluer la performance du Conseil ou de la Direction, même si des normes précises pouvaient être arrêtées. Il n’existe aucun moyen manifeste de récompenser ou de sanctionner la performance. Le Comité conjoint chargé d’examiner la rémunération des administrateurs et des administrateurs suppléants, composé de trois gouverneurs actuels ou anciens, recommandent les augmentations de salaires des administrateurs, sur la base de formules de comparaison, mais sans évaluer la qualité de leur travail. Le CMFI n’est pas officiellement chargé de la surveillance et, en pratique, il ne remplit pas cette fonction. Enfin, il n’existe pas de procédure institutionnalisée d’auto-évaluation pour le Conseil, contrairement à ce qui se passe dans un nombre croissant d’organisations privées, publiques et intergouvernementales. Par exemple, le nombre des institutions sans but lucratif américaines dont le conseil s’évalue lui-même est passé de 23 % en 1994 à 43 % en 2004 (BoardSource, 2004).

    Depuis la fin de 2007, un groupe de travail du Conseil prépare des normes de résultats pour le Directeur général, mais aucune de ces normes n’a été publiée.

    Un groupe de pays comprend en moyenne 10,9 pays au FMI (et à la Banque mondiale), contre seulement 5,6, 7,6 et 5,3 à l’Organisation mondiale de la santé, au Fonds pour l’environnement mondial et au Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement, respectivement.

    Voir Annexe 4: Transparence: politique de publication et d’archives. Selon des études récentes, le FMI se classe huitième parmi 20 organisations internationales en ce qui concerne la transparence. Voir aussi One World Trust (2006) et (2007b).

    Parmi les services du FMI aussi, une grande majorité est d’avis que les communiqués fournissent des recommandations claires au moins de temps en temps, mais selon environ un quart d’entre eux, c’est rarement le cas, peut-être à cause des questions sur lesquelles le CMFI n’a pas pu dégager d’accord.

    Le nombre de pays membres du FMI a plus que quadruplé, passant de 44 à 185, et la taille des services du FMI a été multipliée par plus de sept, de 355 personnes à 2600 environ.

    Il ressort de travaux universitaires sur le processus décisionnel et le comportement de groupe que les conseils d’administration ne doivent pas avoir plus de 10 membres, 12 étant le maximum absolu, pour être efficaces. Lorsqu’un conseil est composé de plus de 12 membres, la qualité de la participation diminue, le processus décisionnel s’atrophie et les problèmes d’opportunisme augmentent. Voir Carter and Lorsch (2003).

    Selon les Spencer Stuart Board Index, 2006, Spencer Stuart 2006 UK Board Index et Spencer Stuart Board Index: Italia 2006, respectivement, la taille moyenne d’un conseil d’administration est de 10,7 membres parmi les entreprises américaines du S&P500, de 10,8 parmi les 150 plus grandes entreprises du Royaume-Uni et de 10,7 dans les entreprises italiennes de premier ordre. Le BIE a calculé que la taille moyenne d’un conseil d’administration était de 13 dans les 50 premières entreprises japonaises en 2007. Selon BoardSource, la taille médiane d’un conseil d’administration parmi les 400 institutions américaines sans but lucratif ayant participé à une enquête récente est tombée de 17 en 1994 à 15 en 2004.

    Martinez-Diaz (2008) a comparé la gouvernance du FMI à celle d’onze autres organisations internationales, dont cinq ont un grand nombre de pays membres. Parmi ces organisations, le FMI, ainsi que la Banque mondiale, ont le plus petit conseil en chiffres absolus, de même que le plus faible ratio taille du conseil/nombre de pays membres.

    Le Comité du budget et le Comité des pensions sont présidés par la Direction. Les sept autres comités permanents (ordre du jour et procédure, rapport annuel, évaluations, affaires administratives du Conseil d’administration, interprétation, liaison avec la Banque mondiale et les autres organisations internationales, et éthique) sont présidés par des administrateurs qui sont choisis par la Direction en consultation avec le Doyen du Conseil. Certains de ces comités ne se réunissent que rarement. Le Comité sur l’interprétation ne s’est pas réuni depuis 1958. Actuellement, aucun comité n’est chargé de la surveillance de la gestion financière, de la politique administrative ou de la politique des ressources humaines, des questions pour lesquelles il existe des comités du conseil dans d’autres organisations internationales.

    Tous les trois ans, l’Assemblée annuelle du FMI et de la Banque mondiale se tient en dehors des États-Unis, ce qui explique les coûts plus élevés en 1998, 2001, 2004 et 2007.

    Comme indicateur de l’expérience, nous avons utilisé l’âge moyen des administrateurs, à savoir 53 ans, contre 53 à la Banque mondiale, 54 à la BAsD et 55 à la BERD.

    Les administrateurs sont élus pour deux ans à la Banque mondiale et à la BAsD, pour trois ans à la BAfD, à la BID, à la BERD, à l’OMS, au FEM, à la BRI et au PNUD, et pour cinq ans à la BIE. Le mandat effectif moyen d’un ambassadeur à l’OCDE est de 3,5 ans.

    Higgs (2003, p. 5). Selon Spencer Stuart 2006 UK Board Index, l’ancienneté moyenne des administrateurs ne participant pas à la gestion était de 3,8 ans dans les grandes entreprises du Royaume-Uni.

    Il a été noté que ce statut dérive de certains aspects de leur relation de travail (par exemple, leur salaire vient du FMI, qui est aussi la source de leurs immunités).

    Au sein du système des Nations Unies, le Secrétaire général a mis en place de nouvelles procédures plus transparentes pour la sélection des dirigeants d’organismes tels que le PNUD. L’OCDE et l’OMC ont aussi adopté de nouvelles procédures plus transparentes. Voir Peretz (2007).

    Selon le Spencer Stuart Board Index (2006), parmi les entreprises du S&P500, par exemple, 96 % disposent d’une méthode formelle d’évaluation de leur directeur général et s’acquittent de cette tâche annuellement. L’évaluation du directeur général n’est plus seulement la responsabilité d’un comité spécialisé: il devient rapidement la responsabilité de l’ensemble du conseil d’administration. Le chiffre comparable pour les conseils d’administration d’entreprises non marchandes aux États-Unis est de 80 % (BoardSource, 2004, p. 9).

    En particulier l’article XII. Une description plus détaillée des mécanismes de gouvernance du FMI figure dans Mountford (2008a), qui examine l’évolution historique de la gouvernance de l’institution. Des résumés de ce document et des autres documents de référence préparés pour la présente évaluation figurent à l’annexe 2; les documents eux-mêmes sont affichés sur le site Web du BIE (www.ieo-imf.org).

    Les gouverneurs ont conservé le pouvoir d’approuver les augmentations de quotes-parts, les allocations de droits de tirage spéciaux (DTS), l’admission de nouveaux pays membres, le retrait obligatoire de pays membres et les amendements des Statuts et de la Réglementation générale. Ils votent généralement par correspondance. En outre, le Conseil des gouverneurs élit ou nomme les administrateurs et est l’arbitre ultime pour les questions liées à l’interprétation des Statuts.

    Le Comité intérimaire/CMFI était censé être un organe provisoire, auquel devait succéder un Collège décisionnaire de niveau ministériel.

    FMI (1974).

    Statuts, article XII, section 3.

    Les États-Unis, le Japon, l’Allemagne, la France et le Royaume-Uni nomme leur propre administrateur. La Chine, la Russie et l’Arabie Saoudite ont choisi d’élire un administrateur qui représente uniquement leur pays.

    Étant donné la distribution actuelle des voix, il est possible pour 1/5 des pays membres de dégager une majorité, ce qui est suffisant pour prendre de nombreuses décisions importantes, notamment en ce qui concerne les prêts. Des majorités spéciales de 70 et de 85 % sont nécessaires pour certaines décisions, notamment celles qui impliquent des changements institutionnels considérables.

    Statuts, article XII, section 4.

    Statuts, article XII, Section 4 c).

    Le questionnaire envoyé aux organisations de la société civile figure parmi les documents de référence de la présente évaluation, qui sont disponibles sur le site Web du BIE (www.ieo-imf.org).

    Cela correspond aux conclusions d’une enquête du BIE auprès des autorités nationales, selon laquelle près de deux tiers des personnes interrogées rencontrent «rarement ou jamais» des représentants de la société civile. Les membres du Conseil d’administration du FMI sont un peu plus ouverts: 18 % indiquent qu’ils rencontrent ou consultent des représentants de la société civile «régulièrement» et 43 %, «au coup par coup». Les participants à une enquête auprès des cadres supérieurs du FMI ont déclaré la même chose.

    Actuellement, les procès-verbaux des réunions du Conseil sont publiés 10 ans plus tard.

    Selon le Département juridique du FMI, aucune de ces deux politiques n’a été formulée avec l’autre en tête. Puisque l’affichage d’un document sur le site Web du FMI est considéré comme une «publication», c’est la politique des publications qui a priorité, même lorsque le document en question est accessible au public. Comme la publication exige une approbation supplémentaire, les documents d’archives qui sont accessibles au public ne peuvent être systématiquement placés sur le site Web du FMI.

    “Capacity Building Measures for the Offices of Executive Directors”, EB/CAM/03/5, 26 juin 2003.

    Africa Group I Constituency, International Monetary Fund and World Bank, “Working Rules and Procedures for Africa Group I Constituency in the IMF and World Bank,” septembre 2003.

      You are not logged in and do not have access to this content. Please login or, to subscribe to IMF eLibrary, please click here

      Other Resources Citing This Publication